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Full text of "The nuisance"

GENEALOG'5 
977.202 
M36mhr 
1916 



INDIANA 

ROOM USE ONLY 



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ANDERSON PUBLIC LIBRARY 






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.LEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBHAHY 



833 01234 7727 



89^9071 



GENEALOGY 
977.202 
M36mhr 
1916 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/nuisanceOOmart 



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MAIN LIBRARY 
ANDERSON PUBLIC UBRA^ 

ANDERSON. INDIANA 



M^t m^Ph. NUJSAKCEt^ J^S^Sf 



The Nuisance 

VOL VIII NO- 8 

ANNUAL NUMBER 

May, 1916 



Published by 

Senior Class 1916 

Martinsville High School 



MARTINSVILLE - - - .INDIANA 



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GREETING. 

"Four Happy years together 
By storm and sunshine tried, 
In changing wind and weather 

We've roughed it side by side 
But the time is drawing nigh, 
We are fledged and we must fly." 



We are leaving our schooldays behind us and passing out 
into the broader stream of life. As the years pass by, may 
this book, with its old familiar faces of teachers and class- 
mates, keep fresh the memories of the pleasant days we 
have spent together. 




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m^ ]NUI5ANCE»J ^g!^S.f 



THE STAFF. 



Editor-in-Chief 
JAMES REID 

Business Manager 
BENTON PORT 

Advertising Manager 
WAYNE ABBOTT 

Associate Editors 

MIRIAM MASON 

LUCILE SARTOR 

HELEN FUSELMAN 

BASIL WILLIAMS 

FLOYD AYERS 

Artist 
ELMER CREWS 



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We, the graduating class of Martinsville 
High School, dedicate this book to our 
teacher and friend 



ARTHUR H. HINES 



'The end has come, as come it must 
To all things; in these sweet May days, 

The teacher and the scholar trust 
Their parting feet to separate ways. 

They part, but in the years to be 

Shall pleasant memories cling to each 
As shells bear inland from the sea, 
The murmur of the rythmic beach." 

Martinsville, Ind., May 25, 1916. 




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Faculty 



"Uneasy lie the heads of all that rule, 

His most of all whose kingdom is a school." 



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J. E. ROBINSON. 

Superintendent. 

Graduate State Normal 

Principal of M. H. S. 1897 to 1901. 

Superintendent since 1901. 



At the close of this year, Prof. Robinson retires from the position 
which he has filled so ably for the past fifteen years. We consider our- 
selves fortunate to have spent the whole of our school life under his kind- 
ly guidance. In all dealings with childish pranks he never forgot that he 
was once a boy himself. 

His influence upon the lives of our city is something that cannot be 
measured. 



"Hj knew the joy the sculptor knows 

When plastic to the lightest touch 
His clay wrought model slowly grows 
To that fine grace desired so much.** 



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A. H. MINES 

Principal. Instructor in Science 

Graduate State Normal 1907 

Instructor in M. H. S. since 1907 

Principal since 1910 



A. W. McCRACKEN 

Instructor in Science 

Graduate State Normal 1911 
Instructor in M. H. S. since 1911 



MISS LILLIAN HART 

Instructress in German and Latin 

Graduate of DePauw 

Kappa Kappa Gamma Phi Beta Kappa 

Instructress in M. H. S. since 1910 




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LAWRENCE SHEIDLER. 
Instructor in History and Civics. 

Indiana State Normal A. B. 1915. 



RUSSEL B. SILSBY. 

Instructor in English and History. 
University of Michigan A. B. 1915. 



MISS ETHEL I. HOUSE. 

Instructress in Shorthand, 
Typewriting and Domestic Science. 

Graduate State School of Science, 

Wahpeton, North Dakota, 1913. 

Instructress in M. H. S. 1914. 




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MISS HANNAH STEVENS. 

Instructress in English 

Graduate of Indiana University 

A. B. 1907. A. M. 1910 

Instructress in M. H. S. since 1910. 






MISS LELA VAUGHT. 

Instructress in Art. 

Graduate of Indiana State Normal, 

Butler College and 
Janerian School of Penmanship. 



HARRY ABBOTT. 

Instructor in Book-Keeping. 

Arithmetic, and Wood Working. 

DePauw University 

Indiana State Normal 

Wisconsin State University. 



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MISS TWANETTE NUTTER. 

Instructress in Music. 

Graduate of Boston 
Conservatory of Music 



MRS. BERYL RUSIE. 

Instructress in Latin and English. 

Graduate of Depaw Ph. B. 1905. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma, Phi Beta Kappa 

Instructress in M. H. S. since 1914. 



R. E. CRAVENS. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Hanover College A. B. 1914. 

BetaTheta Pi. 





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"While wondering Science stands herself perplexed 
At each day's miracle, and asks "What next?" — 
The immortal boy, the coming heir of all, 
Springs from his desk to "urge the flying ball". 
The same bright creature, in these haunts of ours 
That Eton shadowed with her antique towers." 



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Seniors. 



"Physics, metaphysics, logic, mathematics — all the lot — 

Every wisdom crammed octavo, they have mastered and — forgot," 



Class Colors 
GOLD AND BLUE. 



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SENIOR OFFICERS. 



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EVERETT SHIREMAN. 
"Hobby" 

His favorite recreation is a gentle slumber in the as- 
sembly and he has an air of drowsy abstraction which is 
only thrown off in the heat of a basketball game. He is not- 
ed for his contagious smile and loved for his power of add- 
ing humor and freshness to an English recitation. In class 
he may be seen earnestly reading from his text-book. 
Basketball Team, President IV, Class Play. 



WALTER ACHESON 

"Walt" "Atch" 

He entered this High School 
from Brazil in the Junior year, and 
when the excitement created by 
his advent had subsided, immedi- 
ately got into the swing of affairs. 
He gains much admiration from 
the fresh and innocent youthful- 
ness of his face. He is a noted ten- 
or. As leading lover of the class 
play he displayed hitherto conceal- 
ed feeling and ability. 



GLADYS LEWIS. 

Gladys is a charming, lovable girl 
who has maintained a cheerful 
sweetness through all the trials from 
Freshman to Senior. Gladys will 
be remembered gratefully by the 
authors and poets of M. H. S. who 
who have delighted to enshrine her 
in clouds of romance. And the 
strange thing is that with all this 
she is still a pupil to rejoice the 
hearts of the teachers. 



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WAYNE ABBOTT 

"You were a schoolboy, what beneath the sun so 
like a monkey?" 

He is a mechanical genius Avho has nearly 
perfected a new make of automobile. He 
has an abiding faith in Providence which 
often carries him through a hard place 
where a night's study would not. Also he 
is in love, deeply and hopelessly, though 
at most times he makes an effort to conceal 
it. In the latter years of his sojourn at M. 
H. S., he has formed an unbreakable friend- 
ship with B. O. Williams. 

FRANK ADAMS 

"The man that blushes is not quite a brute." 

Until this year a shy and quiet young 
})ud, but lately has blossomed forth won- 
derfully, having real cases which startled 
the whole school. 

FLOYD AYRES 

"Pythagoras" 
"None but himself can be his parallel." 
The only really political man in the class. 
Besides politics, he also goes in for psy- 
cliology, and having made an exhaustive 
study of this subject, is able to judge of 
one's thoughts by the laying on of the 
hands method. He has an air of profound 
wisdom which often convinces the teachers 
wlien his words fail to do so. Many have 
earnestly sought his love but it is not 
known that he ever accepted their ad- 
vances. 

HELEN BAIN 

"She is a phantom of delight." 
A gay and cheerful girl who is never 
bothci-ed by twinges of conscience over 
lessons or work of any sort. She has an 
ever ready smile for her friends and is 
much liked by many of her classmates. 
She takes an ('si)e('ial delight in all social 
timet ions. 




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JULIET BALDWIN 

"Baldy" 

"She walks in beauty." 

Juliet has been a member of our class 
since her return from Franklin in 1914. 
She is a recognized leader and no scocial 
event in this city is complete without her 
presence. 

ALICE BREEDLOYE 

"How tall among her sisters and how fair." 

Alice is noted for her rose leaf complex- 
ion and shy sweetness.- She is a girl wlio 
makes no pretentions of importance in the 
class but quietly goes to work and accom- 
plishes things. She has a desire to make 
those about her happy and at ease and so 
is always gracious and graceful. It has 
been said by a dependable authority that 
she is the mosf beautiful girl in Centerton. 

BYRON BURTON 

"Ah, why should life all labor be? 
A gol darn good feller!" 

Bud is a firm believer in the rest cure 
and is living up to that belief. His mind is 
usually fresh and vigorous for inventing 
new and startling forms of mischief. Sev- 
eral remarkable experiences, shared with 
the Editor of the Nuisance, have cemented 
a firm friendship between the two. He has 
a dread of appearing weak or spinster like 
and therefore exerts himself to be careless. 

IMOGENE CLARK 

"Of him she thinks she can not think too much." 

Noted for the fact that she came from 
Coldwater and is still loyal to it. She finds 
much consolation, however, in the youths 
of Martinsville and her one objection is, 
that more of them do not occupy seats near 
her in the assembly hall. On account of 
her extreme friendliness, she is ungrate- 
fully considered by some, to be a trouble- 
some creature. Her greatest talent lies in 
corresponding with unwilling recipients. 



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PAULINE COMEE 

"With thy sweet smile and silver voice." 

"Nancy" in the class play. 

Pauline entered our ranks from Arizona 
as a Sophomore. She is a proud, digni- 
fied damsel who has ambition to rule the 
world and never lacks that splendid quality 
of self-confidence. 



DOBIS CORDELL 

"Unblemished let me live, or die unknown; 
grant an honest fame, or grant me none!" 

This is a girl who conscientiously does 
lier assigned work aiid is therefore a pleas- 
ure to her teachers. She has spent her 
whole liigh school career in M. H. S. much 
to the credit of our class. 



WINIFRED CRAWFORD 

"She that was ever fair and never proud 
Had tongue at will and yet was never loud." 

She has not been with us through the 
entire H. S. course, but soon became identi- 
licd witJi us after her advent. This cheer- 
In I ix'rsoii is known to all H. S. students by 
her "perix'tual" smile. 

Hr Til FERGUSON 
"Furgy" 

"Her virtues walked their narrow round; 
Nor made a pause, noi- left a void." 

She is a calm and quiet maiden, above 
all things axoiding publicity and notoriety. 
But behind all her gentleness is solid pur- 
l>ose and she is certain to succeed in her 
aim for she constantly strives to make her- 
self efficient in this one thing. In time of 
stress and cxcitejiient it will be soothing 
to think back upon hei- soft voice, her mild 
face and hei- cui'linii- hair. 



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EDITH FLETCHER 

"How brilliant and mirthful the light of her eye!" 
"Fletcli" has spent four years among ns 
in a cool calculating way wliicli has brought 
much credit to herself. She has, seemingly 
without effort, attained that decorum and 
poise which so many of us desire. Com- 
mon sense and perseverance are distinct- 
ive features of her character. 

ELSIE FRITCH 

"Her hair had a breezy curl; 
Her brown eye was merry and wild." 
Elsie wandered into our midst as little 
ones generally do, but stayed to prove her- 
self an .essential to the class. She is one 
of those diminutive persons who make up 
for lack of size by untiring application 
and an unlimited store of dynamic energy. 
She has a pleasing disposition which gives 
her an added distinction in the eyes of her 
classmates and friends (gentlemen in- 
cluded). 

LAWRENCE FRYE 

"Imp of all mischief, heaven alone knows how 
you learned it all!" 

He is without doubt the most affection- 
ate boy in this High School, and his gentle 
manners distinguish him from others. He 
has talents which should be utilized on the 
stage for he bears much resemblance to 
Charlie Chaplin, in action and appearance. 
He is a remarkably deep thinker but usu- 
ally keeps the fact concealed. 

HELEN FUSELMAN 

"Dancing! I love it, night or day; y:> 

There's naught on earth so jolly!" _ 

She is one of those girls who hides under 
a demure exterior, a heart longing for ad- 
venture and gay life. She loves to sing 
and her ambition is to follow Ellen Terry 
as the greatest emotional actress. Indiana 
is too small for her high hopes, and there- 
fore she is desirous of seeking an educa- 
tion and many lovers in the State of Illi- 
nois. 




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DF]WEY (loss 

"Behold the hero of the day; 
A simple, modest, man of clay." 

De\ve>- is an all round athlete, starrini>- 
in Basketball, Football and Baseball. He 
lias been one of the mainstays of our 
Kasketball during' the y)ast two seasons, 
and Ills absence from the f^oor will be 
deei)ly missed next season. He will prol)- 
ably pui-sue his studies at Butler. 

RAY PIAASE 
"Happy" 

"Fai- fiom gay cities and the ways of men." 

A joy to those who are compelled to act 
as bill collectors, for he is always there 
with the gratifying- "kale." He is noted 
foi- his reticence and shy manners, but it 
is said by some that these are only as- 
sume I to conceal the fact that he is pre- 
paring himself for a public speaker. He 
will likel_\- succeed for he has survived nine 
Tiioiitas of note writing l)y Senior girls. 

EDITH HANNA 

"Happy am I, from care I'm free! 
Why ar'n't they all contented like me?" 

l^repai-edness is her motto. Ready for 
an\tliing from storming Blackstones to a 
(Jerman test on IMouday morning. Her 
lii-eatest antipathy is Sophomore boys, and 
he)- goal in life, Seymour. She is almost 
sure to nud<e fame for herself as a trainei- 
of the youthful idea. She is easily shocked 
and has an intense sense of ])ro])riety. 

.M1KIA:\1 iiASTlN(JS 

"Nature did her .so much right 
That she scorns the help of art." 

Wliole-sonled and ever ready to lend a 

li('ll)ing hand, she has endeavored to make 

life pleasant for those about her. Her 

i|niel res('r\-ed and unassmning manner has 

won Tor her a place in the affections of all 

those who know her. She is that tyi)e of 

yii'l which is so aptly descrilx'd in every 

day tei-ms as a t.xpical good scout. 




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RAE JENKINS 

"And her little red ringlets, bobbing, 
Bobbing and hobnobbing." 

Her friendly smile and cheerful voice 
are known and loved down to the timid 
Freshmen. She is not likely to be lost in 
the haze of the future, for she carries aloft 
a crimson headlight, never extinguished. 
She has been a faithful basketball fan and 
she knows how to appreciate a good Civics 
lesson. Coming generations at M. H. S. 
will lose l)y not having her on their com- 
mittees and geography excursions. Her 
favorite food is pepper. 

HELEN JOHNSON 

"My tender youth wa^ never yet attained 
With any passion of inflaming love." 

Helen's greatest characteristic is a sense 
of humor, which often overmasters her in- 
horn love for decorum. She has shown a 
talent for match making and has an ambi- 
tion for conducting a matrimonial bureau. 
However, with all her love for gayety and 
romance, she has always been a satisfac- 
tion to her teachers and can proudly boast 
that she has never caused a single white 
hair for Mr. Hines. 

CLARA KIRK 

"She was the mildest mannered maid." 

Clara is not known for any boldness, nor 
for having an ever wagging tongue but on 
tlie contrary she is noted for her modest 
and retiring ways. 

SHIRLEY KRINER 
"Shanks" 

"T'-e love of praise, howe'er concealed by art. 
Reigns more or less and glows in his heart." 

Tliis is our rightfully all-state center 
who led his team to victory time after 
time, both at home and abroad. When in 
his togs, his figure spells "basket-ball." 
He is a natural leader of others, which, 
along with his many other fine qualities 
accounts for his unbounded popularity. 
His athletic fame isn't wholly confined to 
basket-ball, for he is good anywhere he 
may be; on the gridiron, the diamond, the 
track or tlie field. 




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RAYMOND LOUDER 

"There was a little man, and he had a little sand, 
And he said. Little Soul, let us try, try, try!" 

He has been known to call his own name 

vociferously on several occasions; not for 

notoriety but because he was our famous 

yell leader, surpassed by none. Many 

times his inspiring pep on the yelling line 

buoyed up our team to victory, and his 

popularity will long be remembered by all 

the students who attended M. H. S. in the 

year '15- '16. 

MIRIAM MASON 

"None but an author knows an author's cares." 
One of the most able literary members 
of the class, ranking high in all of her 
studies, but especially those in which she 
can use her literary ability. She intends 
to study landscape gardening at Purdue 
University. 

MARY McCAMMACK 

"She would not with peremptory tone 
Assert the nose upon her face." 

She has been a follower of the red and 

blue for all her four years, though living 

ill Illinois. She is not hilarious, but very 

fond of frolics, provided they are not too 

lioisterous liking such things as quiet hike, 

spreads and moving pictures. She is a 

modest girl disliking show of any kind, 

and therefore she never attempts to make 

display of her brilliant wit. 

MABEL McKINLEY 

"I am content, I do not care. 
Wag as it will, the world for me." 

She looks with ecinal scorn upon labor, 
sohMimity and sentimentality. She be- 
lieves in the prevention cure, and to ward 
off her old enemy, fat, has accpiired the 
habit of "hiking" long distances. She is a 
pleasant person to have around in case of 
dei)ression, for she is uniformly careless 
and good natured, ho|)ing for cheerful end- 
ings. 



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GERTRUDE MYERS 

"Well, miss, I wonder where you live, I wonder 
what's your name?" 

Abounds in unique ideas which usually 
find expression in English. She has an af- 
fectionate disposition, tinged with melan- 
choly, which she strives to overcome. The 
world and its ways are a continual source 
of wonder to her. She has a great deal of 
self-possession which is a valuable asset to 
her. 

RUTH PEARCY 

"Few sorrows hath she of her own." 
Life is not dull for Ruth, for the joys, 
troubles, and experiences of others form 
her greatest concern and delight. She is 
especially interested in Junior boys. Soph- 
omore boys, Freshmen boys and Senior 
boys. Her greatest asset is a vivid and 
ever ready blush. German is distasteful 
to her soft voice. 

BENTON PORT 

"If naebody cares for me, 
"I'll care for naebody." 

One of the best business men of the 
class. He has a peculiar sense of humor 
which makes him a very agreeable person 
to be associated with. He is also very 
prominent in photographic circles. Altho 
Business Manager of the Nuisance, he is 
also the Staff Photographer, and has lost 
several cameras in attemptins' to take pic- 
tures of a few members of M. H. S. 

LOUISE RATTS 

"Too gentle of meen she seemed." 

This lady makes her advent, not from 
the Smokehouse Village north of us, but 
from the city of Herbemont, thus her pecu- 
liar air of lofty indifference to the small 
concerns of this place. She has the appear- 
ance of cold disdain and "uninterest" to 
the concerns of this planet, and, it might 
be added, when pressed to it will stand up 
for woman's rights. 



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MAKGARET ROSE 

"She greets your jests with renewed laughter — 
Oh, she's the girl the wits are after." 

( )ne of our best scholars and a joy to the 
teachers. She is also known for her his- 
ti-()iiic ability and she has always reflected 
credit on her class in any "dramatic" 
event which she has participated in. 
JAMES J. REID 
"Jim" 

"All the great men are dying and I don't feel 
very well myself." 

The Editor is a mystery that has never 
been solved and is therefore very interest- 
iii.U' to certain of the Senior girls. He has 
a natural thirst for knowledge and will 
become a man of achievements. Could 
Destiny speak, it would undoubtedly re- 
late an interesting account of this young 
man's future, for he will certainly figure 
in eitiier i)olitical or literary circles or in 
both. 

LUCILE SARTOR 

"She is a queen in all her ways." 
A popular n;ember of the class and a 
boi-n leader. ( )ne of the few found in High 
School with the initiative necessary to 
"run" a class successfully. She is always 
willing to work for the good of her class 
and her clToi-ts in this line are never in 
vain, future classes will miss much if 
tlicy do not find a person in their midst to 
take up the work of this girl. 

BESSIK STEELE 
"Bess" 

"Unthinking, idle, wild and voung, 
^Maughed and danced and talked and sung." 

The Senior lady of Mystery. She is 
cliai-acterized by her penetrating glance 
and the fascination she exerts over certain 
Senioi- xonths. She has no affinity for the 
useful practicalities of Domestic Science 
or Bookkeeping, preferring the bright 
light of the stage. She has proved herself 
a success as an agent, outselling the ma- 
ji)rit\ in theatre tickets. 



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THOMAS STEWART 

"So young, (for as yet I am not twenty!)" 

Tommy never created any sensations, 
neither was lie unpopular. Very reticent 
and unpretending', lie is found at home in 
the machine shop where he is of greatest 
value to society, I)eing a mechanic by na- 
ture. ''Every man liatli his gifts" so since 
he never roguishly liroke the laws of the 
scliool, Ave may feel confident that he will 
(lex'ejop into a good citizen. 

GUY TERHITNE 

"Twelve years ago I was a boy, 
A happy boy." 

He is steadily climbing the ladder. The 
chief aim of liis life is to become a noted 
pedagogue. Many boys of the lower ^/[""-f 
classes are his intimate acquaintances, 
))ound in the strongest ties of friendship. 
He is noted for his ability on the diamond, 
having spent many happy hours in that 
popular recreation. 

DOROTHY TEVIS 

"Love seldom haunts the breast where learning 
lies." 

Our latest acquisition. She created 
(|uite a "stir" upon her arrival and still 
occupies all the thoughts of one of the 
most prominent members of the Senior 
class. 

MERYLE TRUAX 

"None like her; none." 

A girl of notable charm and sweetness 
who is the solace and standby of the Civics 
teacher. She came here last year from 
Monrovia, but is now recognized as a part 
of us. She looks upon life with due seri- 
ousness, but is undecided which course to 
follow as her career; Avhether the shining 
lights and awe inspired audiences, as a 
concert pianist, or a blue apron and cake 
pan as a cheerful housekeeper. 



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MARY WERSHING 

"Wersh" 
"One vast, substantial, smile." 

AN'itliout doubt the most cheerful person 
in the Senior class. She is never without 
candy, peanuts or some sort of refresh- 
ments with which she consoles downhearted 
Senior boys. Joy making of any kind de- 
light her, and a class picnic is never com- 
l)Iete without her cheerful face. For con- 
snmers of the midnight oil she has nothing 
hut scorn. 

CHARLES PATTON 

"Chuck" 

"What wondrous life is this I lead!" 
A distinct personality, compelling will, 
nnabashed in any position but with a sense 
of propriety; a strongly masculine young 
man. Not having a great love for books 
and hard study, he often successfully gave 
iin))romptu recitations in classes where 
others would have failed. He often dis- 
phiyed the ability of a genius in quick and 
witty replies to a teacher. 

BASIL WILLIAMS 

"Base" 
"I whistle so's I won't be feared!" 
He has a dominating sense of humor and 
is always the first and greatest apprecia- 
tor of his own jokes. He is the pet of the' 
liiris ill tile Seiiioi- rows, but does not take 
This seriously as his heart is elsewhere, 
and his interest in school centers in the 
Department. 



"If a jolly set is trolling 

The Tipperary air, 
Or a cannon-cracker rolling 

Comes bouncing down the stair, 
The teachers looking out 

Sigh, 'Alas, there is no doubt, 
It's the noise of the boys 

Of the class of Sixteen." 



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OFFICERS OF UNDERCLASSMEN. 



JUNIORS. 
Presidenl, Herman Sanders 

Vice-President, Bruce Mars 
Sec-Treasurer, Louise Pearcy 

SOPHOMORES. 
President, Tronie Isenhower 

Vice-President, Albert Frye 
Sec-Treasurer, Elmer Cure 



FRESHMEN 
President, Angus Townsend 
Vice-President, Mona Hickman 
Sec-Treasurer, George Sandy 




\ 



i S tL 





EEHlMSM^SJSi 



LITERARY 



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A FORGIVENESS 

CHARLES PAT TON. 

I ISTENSIBLY Si was a farmer and a blacksmith and occa- 

I ^\ sionlly a cattle drover, but as the agricultural region about 

I \^ him was poor and the pasturage, though extensive, was in- 

^HHH ferior, being covered chiefly with bunch grass and low brush, 

CS^^3 a diet to which sheep and cattle did not take kindly and upon 

which with the perversity of "dumb critters" they refused 

to fatten, the income from even a triple employment like this would seem 

necessarily limited. 

But genius is always superior to circumstances, so Emerson says, and 
Si exemplified the saying by always having an abundance of the comforts of 
life and plenty of money. His wife always appeared in a new dress at each 
annual protracted meeting; his boys wore store shoes, and always, had 
powder in their gourds and shot in their pouches. As for Si himself he 
owned a breech-loading gun even a drummer might not disdain, and used 
real smokeless powder cartridges. His neighbors were told by visiting 
friends from across the river in Amite county that Si actually paid two 
and a half cents apiece for these, and the neighbors heard the statement 
with unconcealed wonder at such evidences of wealth. 

When collections were taken up for what the preacher called "the 
spreading of the gospel of the sweet Savior among the heathens in China 
and the pore Catholics in New Orleans," Si always put in a dollar, Mrs. 
Hardsook fifty cents, the boys a dime each and little Lodelia, the only girl 
in the family, a silver quarter. In consequence Si passed for a deeply re- 
ligious man and the parson always called him Brother Hardsook. 

Nor was Si's generosity purely ecclesiastical. He had been frequently 
known to leave the railroad with as many as two one gallon jugs of "licker" 
and arrive home with the jugs, owing to a liberal sampling on his own part 
and a generous distribution of the same to all he met, who universally at 
first refused to drink, but finally consented, being as how Si offered the 
licker and they would "moist a littler" not as they were wine bibbers and 
gluttonous, but would take a swig for the good of their "inwards." 

Most of his neighbors drank what was offered them and asked no ques- 
tions and made no remarks. But some of them were deeply and audibly 
perplexed as to where Si got all his money. Certain circumstances con- 
nected with Si would linger in their minds and what was worse break 



^mms rrs-TG-<s i^<&m. 




Sfc^^ INUISANCE^ ^S^Sf 



out on tlieir toiis>-nes. Tliey would comment how the neighbors of Si had 
their cattk^ disappear just when they were "most fitten" for market. But 
in tliat great unfenced country what was there to prevent cattle from 
straying? "Dumb critters," said Si, "are mighty biggity and roaming- 
some, anyliow, and Avill sometimes just rush to their ruin." 

Sometimes in the fall country stores near him were robbed and their 
safes 1)1 own open just after the money had been received from the town 
banks to pay for the incoming cotton. It was a strange coincidence that 
after such robljeries Si had more money and distributed more "licker" 
than usual. But Si said, life is full of such coincidences and mystery, 
according to the scriptures. "Leastwise," added he, "that is what the 
parson says the words say, and I ain't the man to dispute a licensed min- 
ister of the gospel, nor is yon, nuther, neighbor?" he would ask of his 
listener as lie lonngingly toyed witli the trigger of his famous gun. 

"No, indeed," re])lied tlie neighbor with alacrity, edging off a little. 
"T don't dis]nite tlie pai"son nuther you. You air both right as fer as 
T know on. " 

Still some folks would prove "too leaky of tongue" in regard to Si's 
affairs, and it was strange how the corncribs and cotton houses of these 
"measly ])ack-capi)ers" as Si called them, had a habit of taking fire in 
the night. 

P)ut one day the grand jury actually indicted Si for grand larceny. He 
was accused of st(»aling ten head of cattle from Mart Swiggles. The chief 
witness against Si was Dune Swarrington, a good-natured farmer too 
stupid to be dishonest, whose farm adjoining the road over which Si had 
to drive the cattle to New Orleans. The testimony was strong for the 
stntc. Si could ahnost hear the grating of the penitentiary doors as they 
swiuiii- open to receive him. "It was an awfid experience for a Chris- 
tian," he u^i't\ to say in after yeat's, l)nt th(Mi lie would add, "the Lord 
l(i\('t h whciiii he chases. "' 

Si went iipdii the stand and testiH(Ml on liis own liehalf. He acknowl- 
edged that he sold the cattle. It was ti'ue he was a farmer, he said, look- 
ing at the farmer jni-ors, a stockman if they would. He was uneducated, 
too, no hangcr-around o\' lawyers an<l conrtrooms, for he thought an hon- 
est farmer's i)lace was in the field, and not loafing around among them 
that re))resented eorjjorations and merchants and so he did not know much 
law hut he was a Christian and an alliance man, and he hoped he did know 
what was right, if he did not know what was lawful, "two mighty different 
thiim's." h(> said, "as sonie anionu' xon k-nows. what has liad homes closed 



t^l^MHs^S 




^Ph^ lNUJ5ANCE^ J^8glS^ 



out under deeds of trust for debts you uever made and. things you never 
bought. ' ' 

The sale of the cattle, he went on, had come about this way. He was 
going to New Orleans with a fine herd. Among them was a most likely 
male. "I wish you could have seen him jedge, " he said deferentially to 
that magnate. "He liad great shiney horns, same as if they were polished 
up for powder horns, and curls like a city gal right down between the 
horns. And was as high steppin' as a preacher or a railroad conductor." 

As he was driving this male by Mart's pasture. Mart's heifers had 
loped out and mixed with his cattle. He had called for Mart, but he could 
not make Mart hear. He, himself had driven the heifers out of the cattle 
at least four times, but they just would come back. The attractions of 
that male was simply terrible, no preacher was more powerful among the 
sisters. It looked like witchcraft or lioodoo or something to that warn't 
natural. 

Finally he tired out driving such contrary minded brutes. "A man 
can't be expected even by the law, to spend his whole time fooling with 
a passell of cows when he's got an honest living to make. So he was 
forced to let Mart's old heifers go plumb to thunder; but, would they 
believe it, they had actually followed him clear to New Orleans. What 
was he to do with them"? Leave them in the streets to be taken up and 
appropriated by the city folks! Not much! They already got a plenty 
of country folks' stuff anyway, by closing out mortgages and deeds of 
trust without just making them a present of the finest cattle in Chicot 
county. So he had been compelled to sell those heifers along with his own. 
Moreover, he was tender hearted and could not bear to part them from 
that likely male. It was true he had never offered Mart the money l)ut 
he liad not had time to do so. Witli his wife sick, and Lodelia puning 
around all the time, and grass just a-whooping in his cotton, he had not 
been able to go over to Mart's and take tlie money. He was going to 
do so on the very next day, when the slieriff liad come and jailed him. 
"To show you gentlemen," he concluded, "that I hain't got hard feel- 
ing again' Mart, though I ain't saying he ain't treated me wrongful, I will 
give him the vally of them heifers here and now." With that he flung the 
money on the table in the courtroom. The jury retired and soon brought 
in a verdict of not guilty. 

As the crowd was pouring out of the courtroom Si nudged Dune on 
the arm and said, "So, you swore again' me did you. Dune?" 

"I had to. Si. I war on oath to tell the truth." 



^m»3 ST-&-T-Gis ;^^ 




^ Mph^ NUlSANCEj^ ^g^lf 



"That's alright about tlie truth," said Si sarcastically. "We all 
knows YOU just love the truth, just fattens on it. And I ain't denying 
that the truth is a good thing in its place, but I want to leave with you, 
that the ti'uth don't stop no lead." 

As he walked homeward Dune decided that a change of air would be 
good for his wife's lungs so he sold out his little property at sacrifice 
and moved to Louisiana. 

One night after the family prayers Si's oldest boy said, "Pap, when 
are yon going to kill that houn' of a Dune Swarringtonf " 

"When the crops are laid by, Sonnie. I'm too busy now to indulge 
in pleasure, business fust, my boy." 

One morning when the last furrow had been plowed and there was 
no blacksmith work to be done, Si said to his wife, "Mammy, hand me my 
gun, I guess I've got time to kill Dune now." 

A two days ride brought him to Dune's place. He slipped through 
the brush to where Dune was plowing. He slowly trudged behind a 
gaunt steer and a worn out plow. His clothes were tattered and his cheeks 
tliin and pale. Not far off Dune's boys were mending a gap in the dilapi- 
dated fence and his l)aby girl was huddled up in a fence corner covered 
by a tattered shawl. Suddenly Si confronted him with his gun. Taken 
by sui-prise Dune started and trembled but soon recovered and faced his 
enemy without blanching. 

"Don't shoot the kids, Si," was all he said. 

lint Si replied, "Don't be nowise oneasy, I rode a hundred miles to 
kill you hut guess you are wuss otf here than you would be in Hell. I 
freely and fully fergive you." 

Si then started off but wheeled suddenly and pitched a silver dollar 
at the anuized Dune's feet. "Here, buy thet air peak-faced young-un' 
a s(]uare meal, lu^ looks hungry." 



imm^l^^ITS. 




hPh^ WUJSANCEj^ jgtSJ^S^ 



THE DAWN OF TOMORROW. 

(A DREAM OF TODAY.) 
JAMES JOHNSTON RFAD. 




|REW, but it is hot," I gasped, opening my eyes as I did so, 
"and such a cramped position," I further ejaculated, not 
fully awake as yet. "And my neck. Oh, my neck," I con- 
tinued, endeavoring to straighten said member, much to my 
discomfort. 

But at that moment my eyes fell on my surroundings, 
and surely a more dumbfounded person never drew breath on this ter- 
restrial ball. So startled was I that perforce I must resort to that old yet 
common remedy of rubbing one's optics. 

"I'll be swiblergenomerated," I needs must ejaculate, and turned my 
gaze from the room to my arms. 

They would not move ! 

Furthermore, and adding fuel to my inflamed mind, they were bound 
hard and fast, swathed to my body with many folds of dusty linen. 

I then would have rubbed my polar extremity but for the fact that 
said useful limbs, the arms, were in such a peculiar state of juxtaposition 
with relation to my body. 

So I again ejaculated, "I'll be swiblergenomerated, but this is an un- 
pleasant state to wake up in!" 

And it was. 

But now my amazement was further heightened, for in close prox- 
imity to my person, some voices were articulating excitedly in a tongue 
unknown to me. 

Craning my head as far forward as my position would permit, I was 
able to look down upon the objects of my attention. 

For the third time my arms unconsciously strove to reach my head. 

The effort, however, destroyed my equilibrium and down I plunged 
fairly into the midst of a group of bald-headed individuals who were in- 
tently viewing what appeared to be the remnants of a — FORD ! 

Luckily (or unluckily, depending upon whose viewpoint is considered) 
I found myself cushioned upon the recumbent form of a person of no mean 
girth; he too astonished to say, "Howdy!". I too frightened to say, 
"Your pardon." 



g^^l>^ ^3"Q 1 Q.^^ JJ^lSi 




};rh^ ivuj5ANcE% ^g^lf 



Til coiisecinence we lay there speechless. The companions of said gen- 
tlenuui, evidently believing that a change of position would be to our mu- 
tual benefit, assayed to lift me from my couch. 

At this crucial moment I inadvertently screamed "Help!" 

The effect was magical. No more could have been expected of "Se- 
same." 1 thought tliat the earth had opened beneath me, but at last I dis- 
covered that I was in my former position, much to the evident discomfort 
of the gentleman beneath. 

"Help!" I screamed again. For the aforesaid gentleman had taken 
this o])portunity to faint. 

The others had fled, so left to my own devices, [ tried to think. 

"Oh, yes," I muttered with glee, "I remember now, this is TOMOR- 
ROW. Last night, at my friend the doctor's laboratory, the yielding of 
myself to science, and lastly embalmed alive, to be awakened in a couple of 
hundred years. T wonder what time it is?" 

But at this juncture the man beneath me grunted. "So you are the 
ninnnny;''" he finally muttered. 

"Oei-tainly, sir," T responded. "I was embalmed last night for a 
couple of hundred years. Where am I and what time is it?" 

.\t this (juestion, or at my exjjla nation, i-ather, my friend of the re- 
cumbent figure l)egau to treniblc. 

"This, sir," he res])onde(l, "is f e Fewcher Museum, City Tewbee, on 
I he planet known as the world. The year is 3()1,;)25 A. D." The day, T 
l»('li('\c, is ;il)()ut the L'Oth of youi- month of May." 

It was in\- ini'n to trem])I(>. 

"Then this is not TOM ()KK( )W— this is three hundred thousand 
years in the FrTFRK." 

"11" yon |»lease, sir," he interrupted my reverie, "if you could mo\<' 
sudicientiN- lo lef me arise. This is most interesting, sir, most interesting." 

"I should smih'," I returned, making a rueful effort to do so; "well, T 
shonhl smile." 

At hist he got to his feet and calh'd vociferously, but in vain. Tui'uing 
lo me, wifli much eCCorf, he l)rouglit nie to my l'e(>t whei'e 1 towerinl abo\-e 
him. 

"Thank you, sir." 

"Vou shall dine wifh me," he said irrelevantly. "You shall meet mv 
I'amily, sii*. " 

"Thank _\-on." 1 i-esponded ineclianicall)-, \\\\ observation bent toward 
that well known article, the l-'oid. "What is that (loiu'>- here ? " 




>. 




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fMIMMMM^^*S§M 



"These, sir, are our most treasured relics," lie replied, pointing 
vaguely toward the whole end of the hall. "That was found several 
years ago in an excavation near the capital. Thirty-five theses have been 
written as to its pro])able use, but as yet nothing has definitely been deter- 
mined." 

I gazed at the rusty, time-worn mechanism mutely. My companion evi- 
dently enjoyed the task of elucidating concerning his relics, "his," as he 
was the superintendent of the museum, lie informed me. 

I now noticed a keg, a keg of the variety T might add, that were 
liauled through the streets of yore, behind huge perclierons and lowered 
then into mammoth cellars beneatli foul-odored apartments. Above, the 
contents of tlie kegs were sold by portly bartenders in dirty aprons to more 
portly gentlemen in the various uniforms of their class. 

"That," my guide announced, pointing to the aforesaid keg, "is an an- 
tique whose great age is be^^ond question. It is a relic of Imrbarism, of an 
era at the dawn of history when man began to think himself an inde- 
structable organization of indestructable parts and acted accordingly. 
Analyzing the fluid found in the vessel, it was discovered to be a virulent 
poison. A quadrangular debate was held on Mars, delegates from Jupiter, 
Saturn, Neptune and this orb participating. That learned body at last 
gave the verdict that the liquid was used in the era of savagery as a method 
of slow suicide, and furthermore, OAving to the large number of vessels 
found, suicide by this method must liave been exceedingly popular at one 
time, ^^ery clever, Avas it not?" 

T, however, was too mucli amazed at the decision of tliat august assem- 
blage to answer at the time. 

"Tlds," my guide continued, "is also an antiquity." Following his 
gaze, I noted what appeared to be the remnants of some tobacco, sealed in a 
glass box. "T found that myself," he proceeded, visil)ly puffing Avith pride 
as he pointed to the half-lmrned clear. "While conducting excavations 
in Telluria, Ave found that and also the oldest prose Avriting of this sphere, 
'Strive and Succeed,' by that master of English, Horatio Alger, Jr." 

As may be supposed, T Avas too much astonished to iuten'upt, and so lie 
continued his explanations. 

"Those vile-smelling weeds (])ointing to the tobacco) Ave at last dis- 
coA^ered to have been given to tliis use. The leaf was cremated and the gas 
giA^en off was used to destroy vermin and other pests of like nature. 
Right, Avere we not!" 

"Certainly, sir," T returned, thinking of the enormous (juantities of 



^Sft» 




# 



a ^;l Q n o.^ fJ 




$iPh^ NUISANCE^ ^g^M 



the weed consumed in my day and the logical conclnsion that vermin and 
otiier j)ests were very abundant at that time. 

"This," my companion went on in his discourse, "is the first poem 
composed by iiicn of this planet. This, sir, marks the dawn of literature 
on this globe. This, sir, is a relic worthy of all the precautions we use in 
connection with this nniseum. This, sir, I dare say, every student of the 
English language can repeat verbatim. This constitutes, with a prose 
work before mentioned, the only extant literature of a language long 
since dead." 

Bending over the casket wherein the relique lay enshrined I deciph- 
ered in almost imperceptible characters, "0 CUT, ^0 CUT THIS LEG 
AWAY, BY THE BARD OF ALAMO." 

"Such," I nmttered, "is the knowledge of YESTERDAY. Proceed, 
please." 

Together we ascended a flight of stairs. "This way out," my guide 
explaining. 

As I reached the roof I was confronted with an enormous statue, 
towering high into the sky. 

"Who is that?" I asked. 

"That, my dear friend," he answered, "is the representation of the 
greatest man the universe has ever ])roduced. Our greatest statesman, sir, 
Mr. Aul weighs Phicksitu)). lie, sir. is the man who dropped the period 
from tlie hinguage." 

I was certainly astonished. 

"Why?" Tasked. 

"Because, sir," here he chuckled assiduously, "because, sir, if there 
was no i)ei'iod in the language, then there would be no necessity for the 
period on (he vest pocket typewriter. And if there was no period on the 
tyiiewriler, the typewriter could then be reduced in size. And if the type- 
wi'iter was i'e(hi('e(l in size the vest ])ockets could also be reduced. And if 
the \-('st pockets were reduced in size, it would iu)t take as much material to 
nud<e them. And if it did not take as nuich material, then so nmch would 
not iia\-e to be shi])|)e(l hei'e from Saturn. (^onsiMiuently we would have 
the biilaucc of ti-nde on oui- side. See? \'ei'y ingenious, was it not?" 

"\'ei'>-," I r<'tui-ued, thinking of oui' own gi-eat statesmen and their 
wondei'l'ul reasoning ability. 

\\\ this time he had led me ti) a (jueer craft into which we stepped and 
without more ado had descemled on another roof. 

"Remai'kable," 1 gasped, thinking of the journev. 



wm'W^i^iTSM'msi 



A KID 



9m^ ]NUI5ANCE^ j^SglS^ 



' ' Come on in, sir, and meet my daughter. ' ' 

Pondering deeply over the various wonders I had heard of, I suddenly 
found myself inside the structure, with a very weak feeling in the pit of my 
stomach. 

"Remarkable!" I found utterance at last. 

"Very," returned ray host, looking beyond me to some one entering 
the room. ' ' My daughter, Mr. — ah — I 've forgotten your name, sir, a thou- 
sand pardons." 

"Headrick — Tom Headrick, if you please. But I do not remember that 
we exchanged knowledge of our handles, sir." 

"To be sure, to be sure. I am A. Guy Asyetunborn, sir; my daughter, 
Miss Rouge." 

"Pleased to meet you, I am sure," I returned. 

To my amazement the girl giggled ! (riggled in my presence, Thomas 
W. Headrick, of Chicago ! Astonishing ! 

But fortunately my host interrupted, thus, "My dear friend, she does 
not understand a single syllable you utter. She can only speak the Pur- 
phekt language. I, perhaps, am the ouly person drawing breath who has 
learned the ancient tongue called English. She can recite for you, though, 
if you please, "Cut, Oh, Cut My Leg Away!" 

And then he broke into that peculiar speecli that had so astonished me 
before. But the girl suddenly stepped forward and with a peculiar slur 
over the "E's," recited the poem, "Cut, Oh, Cut My Leg Away." 

' ' Thank you, ' ' I said when she finished. 

My guide translated this, and the girl having replied, he now made 
tliis startling speech. 

"She says she hates you. You are too tall and you have such funny 
colored eyes!" 

He said this with much embarrassment and finisliing took me by the 
arm and hurriedly left the room. Of course T knew she was much taken 
with me, by her speech, so fell to wondering about her appearance, not 
having been able in the dazzling light of the room to see her to my satis- 
faction. 

Mechanically I bathed, clothed myself, and was led to the hall again, 
scarce noting the procedure. 

I again found myself in the presence of the girl, and my eyes being bet- 
ter accustomed to the light, I was able to note her appearance. Imagine my 
surprise and amazement when I found that no hair graced her head, but 




S> 1 




;r 



Mmmm^ NUJSANCI^lS^^^lf 



instead a queer desi,<>-n was worked upon the crown with what appeared 
to be sticking plaster ! 

"The old order changeth, yielding place to tlie new," I found myself 
repeating. "Perhaps those patches are as well there as on the cheeks!" 

Dinner was served, but I scarce comprehended it, so numbed was my 
brain from my experiences. At last T found myself asking my host why he 
slurred the letter "E." 

"My dear sir," he responded, "that was a magnificent bit of reason- 
ing. Mr. Brillyantman's name will forever be enscrolled in the Halls of 
Fame. The fact was we always noticed that in printing, typewriting, etc., 
the letter 'E' would invariably have to be replaced first. So he eliminated 
the 'E.' ]\rarvelous reasoning, was it not!" 

"Very," T responded. 

The meal being concluded, my host, his daughter and myself pro- 
ceeded to the nuisic room. Soon, however, the father left us alone and, the 
daughter playing a ])ecuiiar kind of musical instrument, I had time for 
thought. Strange to say, I was glad that my life was spanning those cen- 
turies, in fact I could not quite decide whether to settle down and court the 
daughter of my acquaintance (for she was not ill-favoured as to looks 
despite the fact that she wore no hair on her head, besides it is probably 
better to wear none than to wear some one else's) or to get embalmed for 
another three hundred thousand years. 

"Perhaps," I reflected, as I endeavored to sleep that night, "perhaps 
1 had better visit the wonders of the world as my hostess had so kindly 
invited me to do, and spend the next day with her." 

"Her," 1 reflected, "I've only known 'her' for a few hours, yet — yet in 
fact I admire 'liei'!' " 

"So here's hoping I have a pleasant morrow!" 



W^iW^ISI^M 



ic 




hPh^ ISUISANCEi^ glSflS' 




MRS. JONES' TEA PARTY. 

ALICE BREED LOVE. 

S she looked in the mirror before descending the stairs to 
meet her guests Lucile Starke was conscious with a glow 
of satisfaction that she looked very well. The shimmering 
green of her gown brought out gracefully her girlish 
slenderness. Above the low cut bodice a thin gold chain 
gleamed, two j^ade bracelets clinked on one rounded arm. 
She smiled back at the vision of her own joyously flushed face. And giv- 
ing the velvet rose at her belt a final pat, she went slowly down the stairs. 
As she stepped into Mrs. Jones' pleasant living room, the door was just 
opening on Mrs. Jackson and Miss Bagley, Lucile entered and greeted 
them gracefully. Frequently after that the little bronze doorbell rung and 
smiling ladies were ushered in. 

The bright room was soon full of gaily chatting visitors and Mrs. 
Jones in accordance with her own individual custom at tea parties, 
wheeled among them her beautifully appointed tea wagon, the pride of 
her heart. As the cart passed her and Lucile helped herself to a cup, her 
hostess noticed sitting quietly between her and the stout Mrs. Harrison a 
plain, unobtrusive, small person. She flushed a little. 

"Lucile," she said gaily, "You have not met Miss Fleu yet! She is 
one of our few young peo-ple," she finished with an effort. 

For Lucile had suddenly clutched her cup so startedly that the hot 
liquid splashed over the saucer. Her eyes broadened. Her breathing 
became obviously quicker. She turned her face striving for calm, upon 
Miss Fleu. 

"Pardon me," she murmured faintly. Miss Fleu? I had not expected 
to see you here so soon — I thought — " 

"You must be mistaken, Lucile," 
our own quiet Angelica." 

"But I am not," Lucile insisted, 
idsonville that I am thinking of, I beg your pardon," she said turning to 
the person in question. "I am sorry I was so troublesome, and I hope I 
have not hurt your feelings fatally by recalling sad memories to you." 

"Miss Fleu nodded gravely bewildered. Lucile tremblingly took a 
sip of tea, and Mrs. Jones interposed a remark on the weather in an 
effort to detach the glances of her guests from Lucile and Miss Fleu. 



Mrs. Jones interrupted, "this is 
"It is Miss Angelica Fleu of Dav- 



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Lucilc liad noticed her before, a (iniet, little thing with a plain face, 
sniootli bi-owii hair and ))r()wii eyes with a rather wistful desire in their 
de])ths. And she had also noticed that among the others this one had been 
o\-erlooked and lier mind had leayjed to tlie thought that here was a fair 
stai't for winning the bet she made. She had acted accordingly. 

The party proceeded pleasantly if somewhat constrainedly, and Lucile 
foniid it necessai-\- to summon all her self assurance to keep from flushing 
under the glances of tlie otlier ladies, who seemed unable to keep their eyes 
away from her. 

Mrs. Jackson was asked to sing and responded sweetly with, "How 
Do I Know I Love You," while Miss Bagley, who had the distinction of 
having studied piano in Boston, in her turn executed "Dawn at Night," 
by NickolafP. IMrs. Jenkins took advantage of the small stir of Miss 
Bagley 's performance, as well as the empty chair left by that lady to 
beckon Tjucile to her, and under cover of the applause whispered hastily: 

"Tell me, wliat is it >()u know of our Angelica, you seemed so startled 
you have (|uite aroused my curiosity." 

"Beally, T cannot tell, Mrs. Jenkins," replied Lucile solemnly, "only 
tliat this is the same girl of whom T heard, and T know T have not ])een 
misinformed." 

" l)nt who told >'()u?" ITer questioner interposed a final query, the 
otliers w(M"e settliiiu' down in tlieii' cliairs. 

laicile sighed. 

"Someone 1 trusted greatly, — once." 

She h)were(| liei' lashes, l)nt not until Mi'S. Jenkins had followered 
her side ghuice and noticed on Mrs. Jones' ])recise little table a new arti- 
cie, a i)i('ture, the photograph of a young man. 

"Oil," she luunnured as if lialf eidightencMl. 

"Mrs. Jenkins has made a discoverx," came the gay voice of Mrs. 
JacUson across the room, "and T am sure it must be a verv interesting- 
one." 

She indicated the picture and 1 lie eyes of all fastened themselves U!)oii 
it with such t'l-ank intoi'est Tjucile fell hov face color involuntarily. 

"Who would lia\e sns])ected we had such I'oniance in our midst," Mrs. 
liarrisou took up. "Can yon not tell us the name. Miss Stark? You 
know I hat no one (>\-ei' gets too old to be thrilled 1i\- a love storv. " 

"Oh, I caniu)t." Lncile was conscious that she was the target of inter- 
est. She llnslieil aii'ain and then paled. 

"I did not know it was" - 



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She rose irresolutely and lifted the picture from its place, then set 
it down again. 

"Do not think I am rude," she seemed to speak with difficulty, "but 
I cannot tell you anything about him save that lie lives in New York. 
But I do not — cannot speak of him more." 

She sat down and there was an awkward pause. Then Mrs. Harrison, 
who loved the scent of romance, spoke gently: 

"I beg your pardon." 

And Mrs. Jones assisted by others of her guests resolutely turned the 
conversation into different channels. 

When finally the last guest had gone, Mrs. Jones pushed the tea cart 
out of sight, closed the door resolutely and turned to Lucile. 

"Now do tell me," she demanded, "what was the matter with you this 
afternoon, and what mystery is connected with Angelica Fleu!" 
liucile's face assumed a painful expression. 

"Please don't ask me. Aunt Erma," she implored, for I can't tell you 
and I will only incur your anger by a refusal. 

"But your telling me isn't like those others Lucile," Mrs. Jones urged. 
"I am your aunt and you are my guest and I feel it my duty to know. 
You see, Angelica is part of the society of this town, and — well, " she con- 
cluded triumphantly seeing Lucile remained obdurate. "It evidently isn't 
very important for everyone knows Angelica is the quietest girl in town 
and hardly ever goes away." 

Lucile faced her quietly. 
"Remember," she said, "that time a year ago when she was at Bridge- 
port? And at the same time — Albert — he was there," she pointed to- 
ward the picture. 

"Likely it concerns him too, then, " exclaimed Mrs. Jones in exasper- 
ation. "Li that case, I shall not be surprised whatever it is. From the 
way you act, T should not wonder at anything he did." 

Lucile turned her face away for a moment and when she looked up 
again her eyes were wet. 

Instantly Mrs. Jones' animosity fled. She M^ent to Lucile. 

"Pardon me, dearie," she begged, "I didn't mean to hurt you." 

Lucile drew herself gently away. 

"Certainly," she said with dignity, "It is nothing, only remember," 
she stipulated as she opened the door to her room, "that its these quiet 
persons like Angelica who are likely to have the most to conceal. " 

In her own room with the door safelv closed Lucile allowed herself 




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tlie relief of uiileasiiii>' a i>Teat deal of emotion. When slie was calm lier 
liandkercliief was a damp ball, but she wore a strange look, quite lacking 
ill resignation as she wrote a hasty note. She went quietly out a side door 
to mail it. Tt was addressed to David Paul Starke, who happened to lie 
liei- best lo\ed brother. 

Tiie next day passed quietly and Lucile drew a lireath of regret that 
she was fated to spend several days of uneventful quiet in the little town. 

But hei- predictions were not to be so. On the day following came 
iii\itati()iis from Miss Bagley to bring embroidery for a quiet afternoon. 
Lucile accepting gladly found a subtle change somewhere. Miss Fleu 
instead of being unnoticed to the point of oblivion, occupied by tacit con- 
sent tlie center of interest, or rather, this interest had a double center 
and Tjucile found herself the other. It was a novel sensation, distinctly 
enjoyable. And she noticed also there was a more live air about this gatli- 
ering, an interest seemed to be between them. Lucile appreciated the 
sjanpatiiy given to her for her abstracted paleness, an air she had been 
careful to assume. But wlien the ladies parted, it was still with baffled 
curiosity. 

Tt came to LuciU' with jubilant force as she telephoned her acceptance 
to tlic fourth invitation the second week, that Davidsonville seemed to be 
awake after all. The time did not pass dully. With her fresh zeal in life, 
it was a pleasing thing to go to one of the Davidsonville social func- 
tions. To meet at parties young men who regarded her with tender solici- 
tude, and to see how much Angelica's new air of self respect became her- 
and how she enjoyed the novelty of being sought after. 

"Well Lucy," her aunt spoke approvingly to her one fresh morning 
as she lay iti the hauunock — "You are making quite a social success in 
l)avi(ls()n\ill('. Here are invitations from Mrs. Welch for a lawn party, 
and T hope you ai)i)reciate it, for Mrs. Welch seldom gives a party, but 
\\ hen she does, it is sure to outshine all the ones which have been given 
since liei- last." 

She stopped rather l)reithless and Lucile smiled as she took the softly 
tinted env(d()pe frou' ^Irs. Jones' hand. She was glad she had not yet 
worn h('i- i-osc cohiriMl <'re])(» in Davidsonville. 

She was w illiug to l)elieve her aunt's assertion as they came in view 
of Mrs. W(d('li's home, the night of the party. The pretty lawn was strung 
with .Japanese huitcrns underneath whose soft light strolled youths and 
maidens, I'oin.'intically iUnniined. 

little stir when Mrs. Jones and Lucile arrived, which the 



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latter was accustomed' to by this time. But she soon discovered that the 
interest was stronger.: The air seemed breathing with excitement. Lucile 
looked abont her surprisedly. 

Mrs. Welch hnrried np presently. 

"Listen," she said taking Lucile 's arm. Her voice vibrated with 
excitement. "Don't be too surprised at what I tell you. But I've brought 
him to time at last, you didn't know Albert May was my nephew, did you! 
A¥ell, I knew how yon felt, I was young once, and I guessed about this 
mystery of i\ngelica, so I wrote him a good long letter and told him about 
you, and to coine,' tliat it could be settled. I've mended lover's quarrels 
before," she laughed a little, "and so he just sent a telegram saying he'd 
come. He's here now. " 

But I can't see him, I won't," gasped Lucile in dismay, "I must go 
right now." , ,, 

"Mrs. Harrison is bringing him," Mrs. Jones informed Lucile, detain- 
ing her by the arm. 

"Here he is," came Mrs. Harrison's gay voice. "Now, iVlbert, make 
up with her and let us have peace. ' ' 

With utter despair Lucile glanced into the face a])ove lier — the original 
of the picture which stood on Mrs. Jones' library table. The ])icture of 
ber brother's chum which she had annexed. 

"Alright," she heard a voice as in a dream and felt herself being led 
away dbnly conscious that they were gazed at by the otiiers with intense 
interest. 

At a garden seat, sheltered from the light they stopped and Lucile 
found her voice. 

"Really," she told him earnestly, "I did not choose that picture 
because it was you; luit it was convenient for my purpose, and I had no 
idea you were connected with this little town." "Listen," she stopped 
him, "I made a Ijet with my brother, that I could arouse this sleepy place 
to interest and I succeeded." Her voice held a rising note of triumph. 

"Evidently," he agreed. 

"I did hear of Angelica Fleu before," she continued. "My brother, 
who had been here before, told me she was the dullest girl he ever met. 
They surrounded her with the mystery. And I did not once say I had been 
in — that we had known one another. I glanced at your picture and they 
inferred the rest. Now, does that satisfy youl" she breathed in relief. 

"Not at all," he disagreed, "Really, I'd have liked it better the other 
wav. ' ' 




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"Look at Angelica," she proceeded, "that slender girl in yellow with 
tlio tali num. I have really done her good. Charles Harrison would 
never thought of looking at uninteresting little Angelica before, but now 
clothed in mystery she dares to wear yellow and act alive." 

"Yes," he assented, "I believe it all, so lets let Angelica alone. I see 
my aunt looking for us. Shall T tell hei that she Las succeeded in her 
purpose." 

"You need not," Lucile assured him hastily. 

"But she will be disappointed." 

'■'Well," — Ijueile was weakening, — "Think what that means." 

"Certainly," he acquiesce 1. "Why object? Do you, really?" 

She hesitated. 

"Well," she relented at last, "it would be sad to disappoint her, 
wouldn't it? 

And tliey rose and went forth under tlie glow of V'e lights. 




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DRAMATICS. 



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DRAMATICS 

"The Three Chauffeurs," a comedy, was put on by the members of the 
Martinsville Department Club, under the direction of Miss Nora and Mr. 
Harry Hummel. Like all the plays they have put on here, it was a success. 
Several members of M. H. S. took prominent parts in the cast — Charles Pat- 
ton, '16; Shirley Kriner, '16; Pauline Comer, '16; Dorothy Tevis, '16; For- 
est Thorne, '17, and Margory Rinker, '19. A number of M. H. S. girls and 
boys took part in the catchy choruses throughout the play. 

The Department Club has been instrumental in putting several success- 
ful shows on this year\ Among others was the Lincoln Day program given 
at the Grace Theatre. Miss Edith Cramer, '17, took part in this, posing as 
the wife of Lincoln in the living pictures. Another part of the program was 
an old-fashioned minuet danced by eight girls in the costumes of '63. The 
girls were: Misses Ruth Woodv, '15; Mabel Pringle. '18; Bessie Steele, 
'16; Alberta Smith, '17; Myrle"Truax, 16; Mildred Miller, '17: Pauline Co- 
mer, '16, and Mrs. John Adam Hill, '1 5. Mrs. Jones deserves a great deal of 
credit for the way in which she trained the girls for the minuet. 

THE SENIOR CLASS PLAY. 

The Senior class play, "Higbee of Harvard," was given on the evening 
of May 23. The play was somewhat later than usual, but it was well worth 
waiting for. That the class of 1916 had some able dramatic talent was cer- 
tainly demonstrated by the play. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS. 
Watson W. Higbee, from Montana; a good fellow with millions, who 

knows neither fear nor grammar Raymond Lowder 

Hon. V. D. Withrow, a blue-blooded ex-senator, with a tall family tree 

and a short bank account James Reid 

Lorin Higbee, son of Watson; champion athlete of Harvard; in love 

with Madge Everett Shireman 

Theodore Dalrymple, called "Ted"; worked his way through Harvard ; 

in love with Nancy Walter Acheson 

Higgins, the butler Wayne Abbott 

Nancy Withrow, the senator's daughter; an up-to-date, level-headed 

girl Pauline Comer 

Madge Cummings, from Montana ; a quiet sort, with temper when 

needed Helen Fuselman 

Mrs. Ballon, the senator's sister from New York, who meets her second 

affinity at the eleventh hour Margaret Rose 

Mrs. Malvina Meddigrew, originally from Montana; must always be 

shown Miriam Mason 




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A synopsis follows : 

Act 1 — Lawn at the Withrow home, Brookline, Mass. Preparations 
for luncheon. Mrs. Ballon gives some orders. The senator announces an 
expected guest. "A grizzly bear!" Planning a marriage. "If Nancy 
marries young Higbee my mind will be at rest." Arrival of Watson and 
''the fellers." Some tough grammar. "I paid for him to git brains along 
with the other fixin's." The senator drops some hints. How Watson "led 
the German." Malvina and Higgins. "I'm a shy and retirin' critter as 
ever was." Higgins is shocked. "You ungentlemanly female!" Nan and 
Madge grow confidential. A faint and an overturned boat. Ted and Nan. 
An interruption. The senator's eyes are opened. Nan on her dignity. 
Lorin and Madge at cross purposes. The tangle increases. "My father 
— Mr. Higbee, Senior !" 

Act 2 — Drawing-room at Withrow 's evening of same day. Madge and 
Watson disagree. How Watson tried to sing. Cross purposes. Malvina 
gets mad. "He fired me out!" Watson asserts himself. "I say nix for 
never!" Two ways of doing things. "I wasn't cut out for no meely-dram- 
mer villain ! " A game of flirtation — and trouble. The fathers are deceived. 
"Paired oft' right!" A sudden awakening. Madge speaks out. Father and 
son. The quarrel. Watson lays down the law. "Take it or leave it — I don't 
budge." Nan and Tedd add to the trouble. The climax. Kicked out. Hig- 
gins ' ' butts in ' ' and gets ' ' fired. ' ' Off for the West. ' ' Good-by ! ' ' 

Act 3 — A mining camp in Montana, five months later. A hard luck 
crowd. Bread and potato diet. "Tomorrow is Thanksgiving Day, and no 
chance to steal a turkey ! " A nightmare of a mine. ' ' Tomorrow we starve ! ' '^ 
An unexpected visitor. "It's that awful female woman!" "Isn't he cute?" 
Interesting news. Boston baked beans ! A dream fulfilled. More visitors. 
A couple of would-be "stern parents." What Watson learned. When to 
apologize. "Lookin' down the throats of a pair o' Winchesters." Still 
more visitoi's. Malvina sings with dire results. Everybody in a maze. 
Higgins gets desiderate. "I'll blow up that confounded mine!" Plain 
words. An explosion. A fortune at last. Matrimony in the air. Watson 
nuikes a match and is matched himself. A (juadruple wedding and every- 
body invited. Finale. 

The actors all carried out their i)ai'ts to i)erfection, and we are sure if 
the authoi- of the play could ha\-e seen it he would have rejoiced to find that 
at last his play was gix-cn as he meant it to he. But in praising the actors 
we must not forget to gix'e a great part of the credit to Mrs. Walter Acheson, 
who so al)l\- (lii-(H't('(l the play. Fnder her training the many good points 
of the i)lay wei'e brought out linely. 

(This article was written before the play was given.) 



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ATHLETICS 



Under the able guidance of Professor R. E. Cravens and Mr. Hotch- 
kiss the High School Athletic Association spent a most successful season 
in all branches of Athletics that were taken up. The first Football Team 
in several years v^as organized and played consistently against the veter- 
an teams of such schools as Brazil, Greencastle, Noblesvllle and Browns- 
burg. Taking all into consideration, the results obtained this year were 
excellent, and with the experience acquired by the boys in the past season, 
a championship team can be expected next fall. In basketball a team was 
produced that perhaps was the best in the state, and would no doubt have 
copped the championship had they not been the victims of a serious mis- 
in the games the week before. 

FOLLOWING IS A SUMMARY OF THE SEASON. 

Martinsville's average, percentage figured on games won 

and lost throughout entire season, _ _ _ _ ,760 

Martinsville's average, percentage figured on points scored 

by M. H. S. as opposed to points scored by opponents - .624 

Points scored by M. H. S., - - - - - 850 

Points scored by opponents - _ _ _ _ 512 

THE FOOTBALL TEAM. 

Sanders, Capt; Kriner; Shireman; Frye; Goss; Fishel; Davee; 
Stout; Crone; Teeters; Curtis; Wershing; Crone; Thorne; 
Baugh; Bales and Mitchell. 

THE BASKETBALL TEAM. 

Kriner, Capt.; Curtis, Sanders and Mars; Forwards; Goss, 
Shireman and Frye, Guards. 



OUR "M" MEN. 

At the close of the season, beautiful .sweaters were presented to 
the following men for their work on the basketball floor during the past 
season. 

Kjincr, Goss, Shireman, Sanders and Curtis. 



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Yea, Martinsville, 
Let's go. 



Hit 'em high 
Hit 'em low 




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LL TOGETHER 



Boomalaca, boomalaca 

Bow-wow-wow, 
Chickalaca, chickalaca, 

Chow-chow-chow, 

Boomalaca, chickalaca 

Rickety-russ 

M. H. S. you bet that's us. 



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THE OLD ASSEMBLY HALL 

Four years we've been together, 
In our High School career, 

Thru all sorts and kinds of weather, 
With the friends we loved so dear. 




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We've strolled thru all the class rooms 

And o'er the Building wide, 
We've laughed and chatted merrily, 

Each by his classmates side. 
We've strolled around the school yard 

Then to the 'Sembly Room, 
When in spring the birds are singing, 

And the flowers are all in bloom. 
Each passes to his classes. 

Until the hour of four, 
When the old school gong is sounded — 

One more school day is o'er. 
We're now the jolly Seniors, 

Just Forty Six are we, 
Our sails are being gathered in. 

For the gales of life 's great sea. 
Our future stands before us. 

It stares us in the face, 
We're making preparations, 

For life's great Derby race. 
School days will soon be over. 

Schoolmates we'll cease to be. 
But scattered o'er the country wide, 

And e'en some from sea to sea. 
Thru the fields of life's great struggles, 

Or in times of great distress. 
Nothing sweeter can be remembered. 

Than the davs of M . H. S. 





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O K £ S 

IS IT HOT FiNOUGH FOR YOU? 
BY ROGER BEAN, '17. 
Last Tuesday when I fi rst woke up, 

I thought the wind would roast me. 
And when old Sol came o'er the hill, 

I thought his breath would toast me. 
I managed, tho, to don my clothes, 

Just as I always do. 
Pa met me at the door and said: 
"Is it hot enough for you?" 
"0, yes," I grunted back at him. 

And never cracked a smile, 
For well he knew that I was 'bout 
To smother all the while. 
I went to school and at the door 

I met our friendly Sue, 
The first thing that she said was this : 

"Is it hot enough for you?" 
I tried to smile as I walked in. 
But Gee Whiz, I was sore. 
And as I struck the upper hall, 

A man stood at the door. 
I thought he'd say "Good morning" 

As the teachers always do. 
But instead he asked the question 

"Is it hot enough for you?" 
I vowed I'd stay no longer there 

To be greeted thus all day 
So I put on somewhat extra speed, 

And made my "get away." 
I went down to the swimming hole — 

Some boys were down there too, 
And when they saw me, they yelled out : 

"Is it hot enough for you?" 
I've tried in vain to get away, 
I've missed it every time, 
And now I've given up all hopes. 

Of any cooler clime. 
I've decided, when I pass away, 

And bid this world adieu. 
That the first thing I shall hear will be : 
"Is it hot enough for you?" 



m^f^^IBMMMM*SMM 



JOKES 



Soph — "Say, they have stopped sending' mail to Washington. " 
Freshie— "is that so! Why!" 
Soph— "He's dead." 



Fresliie — "Doctor, will you give me something for my head!" 
Doctor — ^"I AYonldn't take it as a gift." 



There was a yonng chink named Sing Sing, 

Who fell from a trolley ear — ])ing! 

The con tnrned his head, 

And looked round and said, 

"The car's lost a waslier — ding, ding!" 



Rae J. (giving the life of Thackeray) — "PTis Avife became insane soon 
after her death." 



A gii'l wlio di(hi't like to say "spit" nor "pants,'' once saw a Spitz dog 
coming down tlie street and said, "Just see how that Saliva dog trousers." 



INfi'. Hines — "Why do you make light of this suhject!" 
Student — "Because it's gas." 



Teacher— "Tonnny, tell about the Dead Sea." 

'^fonnny — "I don't know." 

Teacher — "Don't yon know anything about the Dead Sea?" 

'^I\)mm\' — "l)i(hrt know one had cvi'V been sick." 



Atlas was the original hohl-up nian. 

Tiac: (after deep silence) — "What are you tliinking about, Frank?" 

Fi'ank: "The same thing you are thinking of." 

Rae: "Oli, Frank! if you are I'll scream for Papa." 



Lives of gi'c^jt men all remind us 
AVe should always do our best. 
.\nd dcparling, Icax-c behind iis, 
Xolchooks that will help Ihc rest. 



W^WSE^^SM'^^M 



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JOKES 



Professor Abbott — ''Larry, you will lead tomorrow's recitation." 
Larry (half asleep)—" 'Taint my lead; I dealt." 



Scientific name for snoring — "Sheet Music." 



We laugh at teachers' jokes, 
No matter wdiat they be; 
Not because they're funny. 
But because it's policy. 



Two Irishmen walking along the street. 
"Look what beautiful hide that girl has," cried Pat. 
"You must say skin, Pat," said Mike. 

The next Snnday at church Pat sang, "Skin me! Oh, Mv Savior, Skin 
Me." 



A man who sells shower baths on five days' trial, sent one out to a 
man in the rural district and told him if at the end of five days he was not 
satisfied to send it back. He received the following answer: 

"Your shower bath looks good, but I ain't had no chance to try it be- 
cause the five days passed before Saturday night came around." 



Cupid never shoots unless he "Mrs." 



Myrle — "T went home to see my parents over Sunday." 
Miss House — "Well, how did you find them?" 
Myrle — "Oh, easy; I know where they live." 



"Don't yon worry about those poor boys in the trenches!" 
"T ought to, I know, and I would but the fact is I'm in the hole most 
of the time mvself . ' ' 



Our father slipped upon tlie ice 
Because he couldn't stand. 
He saw the glorious stars and stripes; 
We saw our Fatherland. 



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INSANITY. 

Insanity is something that otlier peoyile have and you haven't; for in- 
stance, if a poor simp does something unprecedented and in nonconform- 
ity with your categories, he has (to your mind) a spark of insanity wander- 
ing about through his mental pabnhim. When a person is insane he is 
dubbed crazy. There are times when one will admit he is crazy, for ex- 
ample, if you, in a moment of mental aberration, should chance to send 
some one's immortal soul to the pale shades of Orcus, you and your law- 
yer will argue that you are off your nut. 

Sometimes insanity is determined by one's financial status; thus, if a 
meek little guy, with a patch the size of a pocket handkerchief sewed later- 
ally across the posterior region of his pantaloons, should attempt to prom- 
enade down the public highway barefoot and bareheaded, the consensus of 
opinion would be that said meek little guy was rapidly nearing the door of 
the boobyhatch. But on the otlier hand, if a man whose moniker bore a 
string of A 's in Dunn or Bradstreet, should walk upon his eyebrows from 
the postoffice to the courthouse, such action would be classed as one of Mr. 
James Orphington Doodle's pranks and the perpetrator would only be 
termed eccentric. 

Every one has a spark of insanity somewhei-e in their system because 
the genus homo is not a perfect machine and in tlie liest of machines the 
engine misses once in a while. Insanity is like a gob of powder in one's 
think tank and requires just the right spark to blow up the w^orks. A man 
who eats three squares a day and works like sixty may be crazy as a bed- 
bug on politics or religion, and an otherwise perfectly rational female of 
the species may go into hysterics if compelled to wear the same lid two 
seasons; a short-sighted naturalist who knows enough to come in out of 
the rain may be persuaded to do a Brodie off of Lookout mountain or dive 
into the Dead sea after a new s])ecimen of the orangotangus spiflflicatus. 

Insanity is a rare thing among animals but among humans an insane 
impulse once the whim of some boob takes the form of an epidemic and 
becomes acute or breaks out as a fad ; custom being an unwritten law which 
gives a man the privilege to do many outlandish things without comment 
by reason of this universality; and a whim which has reached the debu- 
tante stage and makes its (h'I)ut into society. 

But cheei- up, many a man who had peculiar ideas circulating in his 
dome has hccii ternied crazy }et somehow managed to grow up and 
become a good citizen. 




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W^tls^^MM^^i^^ 



CALENDAR 



Sept. 13 Registration day. 

243 enrolled in High School. 

14 Nuisance distributed. Lecture for H. S. students at Switow's 
Theatre under the auspices of iVnti-Tuberculosis Society. 

15 Dixie Day. School dismissed at 11:00 A. M. for rest of day. 
Gov. Ralston made speech in afternoon. 

16 Seniors select class pins. 1st. class meeting Seniors. Seniors, 
Sophs and Juniors all elect officers. 

17 "Since boys clothes are endangered there shall be no class 
scraps tonight." Speech by Prof. Hines. 

20 First furniture for Staff- room bought. 

21 Boys interested in Foot-ball meet with Mr. Cravens. 
23 Officers of Athletic Association elected. Mr. Cravens, Pres., 

Dad Lowder, Sec.-Treas. 

27 All pupils without books sent home, especially Seniors. 

28 Address on "Anatomy" by the Rev. R. W. Thorne. 

29 Lecture on "Athletics by Herr Abbott. About the only thing 
said was "Come out to Football. What could you expect. 

" 30 Miss Robbins asserts her rights. Cans Charles and Bess, 

Oct, 1 Music Day. "Yankee Doodle" for a change. Herr Abbott 
appointed "Crier" for lower session hall; announces losed 
etc. Senior class pins arrive. 

" 4 About $50 raised for Athletics. Blue Monday. 

" 5 German test. 

" 6 Arithmetic test. Bible study renewed. Twan's car hoisted 
upon steps of school building. She descends with greatest ease 
while boys view descent from curb. 

" 7 Riley Day. Short program at 10:00, Fire Drill. The first 
since 1913. M. H. S. represented by Herr Abbott at Riley pro- 
gram at Grace Theatre. "That Old Sweetheart of Mine." 
School dismissed at 3:30 so students might attend Riley pro- 
gram at The Grace. 

" 8 Chorus class begins in earnest. Seniors to give minstrel show. 

" 11 Fire drill to see parade of Chicago Dixie Tourists at 11:00. 




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Nov. 



13 



14 
15 
16 

19 

20 
21 
22 
23 

26 

27 

28 

29-30 
31 

1 
2 

3 
4 

5 

7 
8 
9 

n 

12 
13 
14 

15 
16 



Talk by Rev. Harriman on ''Disciplined Mind." Report day. 

23 Junior Latin failures. 113 students got A's. Seniors buy 

invitations, Juniors buy class pins. Freshman class meeting at 

Rosa Wicli's. 

Prof. Brewer absconded. 

Nuisance distributed. 

Football game at Brazil. B. H. S. 51; M. H. S. 0. "Great 

teams have small beginnings." 

Cats, etc. Sec'y.-Treas. resigns. Arrival of Dorothy. 

Apologies. 3 Seniors canned. 

Talk by Thomas Brooks Fletcher. 

Shanks presides over stage from wings during Bible study. 

Prof. Abbott badly injured on the little finger. Best program 

of the year. 

Senior history rests. First of the year. HARD. 

Juniors and Freshmen have hay ride and parties. 

Recess out of doors in Bible Study Period. Last day of school 

until next week. 

Teacher's Institute at Indiana])o!is. 

Hallowe'en. 

Seniors take no books home. SclianI ^ 

Faculty picnic. Students out en masse. Show at Blackstones^ 

Snake in the G>in. 

Talk by the Rev. E. Richard Edwards. "Knowledge, Ability 

and Wisdom." Tickets for "Lavender and Old Lace," on sale. 

Football game, M. H. S., 37; Noblesville H. S., 0. 

Wind, wind, wind ! 

"Lavender and Old I^ace. " 

Certain Freshmen promoted to 8th grade. 

November Nuisance distributed. 

Brownsburg H. S. 19, M. H. S. 0, the last game of football. 

First snow-fall. 

M. H. S. delightfullv entertained bv the Ju Jube Quartette of 

Shelbyville. 

A very good lecture on the "Life of Saul" by Mr. Abbott. 

"Life of Paul" concluded. 




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18 Talk by Judge J. W. Williams on "Youth." First practice 

teaching in 4B x\rithmetic Class. Rain. 
17 Long music period. Rain. 

21 Model Latin recitation by Seniors before the Juniors, Birds. 

22 New system in giving aid to pupils in studies. 

23 Paper by Prof. Abbott on "Thanksgiving Day." 
24-25 Thanksgiving vacation. 

28 No Bible Study. German class divided. 

29 Bible Study in lower assembly. New system. Tests in Bible 
Study. 

30 Very good program with school talent only. German. 

31 New dishes for Domestic Science Dept. 

Dec. 1 Lectures by State Entomologist. Students not allowed to go to 

concert by News Boys Band. 
" 3 First Basketball game of the season. Score 35 to 22 in favor of 

Cicero. 
" 5 Lecture by Dr. Kinneman on "Health and Efficiency." 

New table for Domestic Science Dept. 
" 6 Report cards. Mr. Hines wears dark glasses. "Shepard of 

the Hills" at H. S. auditorium under auspices of seventh and 

eighth grades. 
" 7 Bess and Prof. Abbott. Fuss. 

" 8 All boys in music class canned. Two basketball games. Indi- 
ana Veterinarv College 21, Martinsville Commercial Club 25. 

Arcadia H. S.'32, M. H. S. 25. 
" 13 Two "canned Kids" back. All second year German class canned 

for all day. One Freshman girl appears in uniform. 
" 14 Domestic Science table dedicated by spread. 
*' 15 Junior pins arrive. Nuisance distributed. 
" 17 Alice and Myrtle celebrate birthdays. 
" 20 Basketball, M. H. S. 24, Hopewell H. S. 20. 
** 21 Tests. Bess canned again, 
" 22 Good grades on Arithmetic test. 0-33. 
" 23 No English recitation. 

" 30 Last day of school this year. Alumni visitors. 
" 31 Basketball, M. H. S. 25, Fairmount Academy 20. 





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Jan. 3 All-stars 59, Commercial Club 16. 

" 4 First school day of 1916. New teacher begins, worse than some 

others. 
•' 5 German test. Mr. Robinson visits Arithmetic class in Senior 
boys uniforms. 

Fire drill nearly scared Mr. Silsby to d^ath. Basketball, M. H. 
S. 46, Mooresville H. S. 22. Hooray! 

6 Excellent English recitation by 4B's. 

7 Cicero at Cicero, C. H. S. 24, M. H. S. 16. Played in a barn. 

10 Talk by Grandfather Johnson on "Abraham Lincoln." 

11 Rain. Basketball. M. H. S. 46, Plainfield H. S. 23. 

12 Well! Report cards. 

13 English Room too cold for recitation. Obbie has so much 
money that it persists in rolling out of his pockets onto the 
Hoor. Result — Noise. 

14 Broad Ripple H. S. 19, M. H. S. 31. 

17 Cold weather. English room too cold again. 

18 Brazil H. S. 14, M. H. S. 67. 

19 Fire witnessed by several classes from window. 

20 Slick. Sleet and ice. 

21 Eest ist warm hente. Franklin H. S. 6, M. H. S. 47. Arith- 
metic class party. Candy and Carnations. Seniors only have to 
have 16 units. Hooray ! 

24 First day of Second Semester. Mr. Hines busy making out credit 
cards for Seniors. Baldy comes with distinctive hair dressing. 

25 West Newton H. S. 15, M. H. S. 57. 

26 Report cards given to those who failed first semester. "Three 
Chauffeurs." 

27 No study period before first class. Some will not have lessons. 

28 Program final Iv arranged. 
31 Flood. 

V\']). 1 High School dismissed in afternoon for funeral of Lillian Louise 
Rusie. Southport game postpwied. 

2 Mr. Hines gives spread for B. B. team. 

3 Dewey back from flood district. 4B Arithmetic test. 

4 Brazil at Brazil. B. H. S. 22, M. H. S. 18. 4B Arithmetic test. 

8 Southport at Martinsville, S. H. S. 30, M. H. S. 39. South- 
port's only defeat of the season. 



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9 Visitors. Blanch Bain and Twan Nutter visit the German 
class. Report cards. Seniors canned all day for tardiness. 

10 0. P. West visits M. H. S., a former instructor here. 

11 Bible Study resumed. New Bethel H. S. 23, M. H. S. 41. 
14 Sophomore German class canned. Fire drill. 

17 Pictures of B. B. boys appear in Star. 

18 Franklin at Franklin. Special train 175. F. H. S. 9, M. H. S. 
39. 

21 Miss Robbins substitutes for Prof. Abbott. 

23 Miss Hart entertains unwedded teachers with pink tea. 

24 Broad Ripple H. S. 21, M. H. S. 28. 

25 Wingate H. S. 13, M. H. S. 21. 

26 Yell practice every other day, from this time till tourney. 

27 Luncheon given by Domestic Science classes. Board of Educa- 
tion. Supt. Robinson and Faculty were the guests. 

"' 28 Program taking two periods. Three periods omitted today- 
Yell practice. 

Mar. 3 Miss Stevens absent. Nuisance distributed. 

4 Monrovia H. S. 47, M. H. S. 2d team, 23. 

5 Schedule for Tourney Games out Martinsville's first game is 
with M. T. H. S. * 

7 Gladys Bray substitutes for Miss Stevens. 

8 Goss is sick with tonsilitis. Taken to Home Lawn. 
10 Sectional Tournament. Everybody is happy. Martinsville wins 

today. M. H. S. 109, Opponents, 49. 
13 Yell Practice for State Tourney. 

16 Team and many enthusiastic fans leave for Bloomington. 

17 M. H. S. takes both Washington and Lebanon down line to the 
tune of 53-22 and 16-33 respectively. 

18 Sorrow in the camp of the Red and Blue. We bow to Lafay- 
ette, Champions of Indiana. 

19 Large crowd greets returning warriors. Brass Band, Speeches. 

20 M. H. S. team entertained at the Grace Theatre. 

21 Banquet at Home Lawn for B. B. boys. Nit ! 
23 Mr. Cravens got to school on time! 

H. S. students invited to Grace Theatre. 




^j^Sf Ma^ NuisANci^a ^jgai 



( ( 


27 


n 


29 


i I 


31 


April 


1 


i i 


2 


i i 


12 



'' l.s 

" 14 

" 21 

<< 22 

*' 25 

May 1 



10 

n 

12 
15 

IG 
19 
21 
28 
24 
25 

26 



Special Arithmetic Class for failing Seniors. 

Mr. Haven of Presbyterian Evangelistic party entertains us 

with piano recital. 

Evangelistic party visits M. H. S. 

Alberta Smith entertains B. B. boys at her home. 

April Fool party at Mary Gano's. 

Banquet at Home Lawn for B. B. boys. 

M. H. S. Penal Farm opened. 

"The pen is (sometimes) mightier than the sword. Great is 

the goose-quill, say we all; Amen! But sometimes the spade is 

mightier than the pen." 

More convicts ! 

German II gives program for themselves. 

Arbor Dav program. Presentation of Cogshall Picture to M. 

H. S. 

Mr. Hines elected Superintendent of the schools in Cambridge 

City. 

Teachers surprise Mr. and Mrs. Slieidler. 

Talk by Assistant State Fire Marshall. As a result two barns 

burn about one o'clock. 

Senior Box Supper. Consequently Miss Hart gives German IV 

eight pages. Class Play Picture taken. B. B. boys wear their 

new sweaters. 

Indiana program by Sophomore English classes. 

Theoretical Music class visits Staley's Music Store. 

Mr. McCracken is absent. 

Juniors issue invitations to Banquet. 

Strange visitors. Seniors would like to know to whom they 

should respond. 

Shanks and Pete off tor Culver. 

Banquet. 

Baccalaureate Sermon bv Rev. Thorne. 

Class Play. 

Circus. 

Commencement. Dr. Black makes address. Reception by Supt. 

Robinson. 

We belong to the Alumni of M. H. S. 




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SS^^ffi^J^JJSf 



SENIOR AUTOGRAPHS 




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Uj^jfi^rnsM^^JM 



CLASS PROPHECY. 



The great lecturer on the ** Psychology of Cosmic Disintegration" had 
spoken in impressive statements, and my mind retained some of his closing 
words. 

"It is quite possible," he had said, "to penetrate into the future with 
our human eyes. It is only the hea\ y imprisonment of fleshly sloth that 
blinds us. If one could free himself from this tyranny for a moment, and 
believe in himself, he could look forward, pierce the darkness, and by means 
of Cosmic Disintegration the future of any one would be projected upon his 
plane of vision." 

It was my desire to obtain this sight, so that I might inform myself of 
the future careers of a certain body of persons which is rather interesting 
to me, the class of 1916. Therefore, following the directions of the wise 
man, I set forth to a high and lonely mountain and dwelt in solitude and 
frugality until the night before the Junior banquet, at which my fast was 
to be broken with a violent crash. Here I placed myself upon a comfortless 
stone and gazed intently into the darkness. 

The scientist had spoken truly. I seemed to be seeing a motion picture 
show, and as I looked I recognized that I was actually gazing into the fu- 
ture at people I knew. 

I beheld Imagen Clark entering the office of the "Yellow Sheet Daily," 
a roll of manuscript under her arm. She had married the editor of this 
publication and controlled the two together. 

Then upon a great stage I saw our old friend Raymond Lowder, the 
renowned tragedian of the age, even tiien in the act of causing the huge au- 
dience to melt in sobs. His words came to me, "when your dear mother 
died." Tears blinded my sight. 

More cheerful was the next picture. The sun shone sweetly upon a 
stately ^'irg•inia home. Climbing roses veiled the porch, but I could see 
within its shade her who was once known as Pauline Comer. She awaited 
with eager joy the approach of a martial figure on horseback. It is as I 
thought — she never survived the Virginia summer. And the one on the 
horse was iiof Walter! 

No. He appeai-ed in the dim light of some subterranean place, a lan- 
tern in his hand, bending over as he scanned the ground carefully. Was he 
searching for an honest man? Then he stood upright and I knew by the 
article in his hand that he was the great mushroom specialist of the day. 



g^8i ^:T-srT^-«s s^^g 



l^£M§M^^iPM 



Then there unrolled a field of daisies, among which strolled two people. 
Eternal lovers ! Giving to the world, as they had to the High School, an 
example of fidelity. Dorothy's dress was apple blossom pink, and Shirley's 
face as he bent over her was ardent as it had ever been in the old days. 

The field melted into the elaborate drawing-room of one of the most 
magnificent homes in Morgantown, where a large formal reception was pro- 
ceeding. The hostess was the one time Bessie Steele, married to the lead- 
ing financier of the city, and the society dictator. 

Now a vast hall, wherein a lecturer holds his audience spellbound by 
his fiery eloquence. This lecturer, famed also as the inventor of many 
safety appliances, is Dewey Goss, who devotes his life to the cause of 
" Safety First. " 

A pleasant sylvan scene. Here I see more than one of my old friends. 
In a low and thriving cottage dwells Ruth Pearcy, married to the "happy 
farmer," who also acts as auctioneer at box suppers. With her dwells 
Clara Kirk, (piiet and unpretentious as ever. As neighbor to them is Ray 
Haase, a solitary bachelor, but we see this will not continue long, as these 
two shy people have almost come to an understanding. 

A tangled maze of colors blinds my eyes for a moment, but I see it is the 
Futurist Masque, headed by Helen Bain ; neither is she the only follower of 
the dramatic art, for here in a bewildering costume of the ancient East Juliet 
Baldwin whirls through the swift and intricate measures of the ''Shehera- 
zade. " 

Here in a dim, strange smelling laboratory I behold the good joke edi- 
tor, Basil Williams. What can he be doing — peering into the smoking cru- 
cibles? Something noble, certainly. Ah! compounding a ''harmless freckle 
cream. ' ' Not for himself, to be sure — he never needed it — but for his old 
friend, Rae Jenkins. Unselfish soul! 

And she! She has forsaken her disconsolate swain in Martinsville and 
taken up the fascinating task of designing dresses. I behold her under the 
glaring sun of Peru, seeking new styles, and acquiring more freckles. 

Helen Fuselman, longing for a life of adventure and romance, has gone 
to Montana, where men are plenty and there are no old maids. I see her 
upon a rampant broncho, dashing across the plains in pursuit of admiring 
cowboys and miners. 

Now tall trees cast mottled shadows over the green English grass, and 
under the trees walk the students garbed for graduation. And here is the 
student Margaret Rose (for Cambridge has opened its doors to women) 




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m^^m^^M^M^M 



most serene and dignified of all, nearly ready for her last school diploma. 

Here is the flnrry and bustle of a spirited campaign — the shrieking of 
the brass band, the rise of the camp song. Charlie Patton is contending 
strenuously for the vice-presidency, opposed vigorously by Larry Frye, who 
promises, however, to console himself with the mayorshij) of Terre Haute if 
beaten. 

After this it is comforting to look upon quiet scenes again — Winifred 
Crawford planting morning glories around the fence of her country home, 
Frank Adams singing in cheerful solitude as he turns the well-rounded fur- 
row, Gertrude Myers waving a fond good-by to three children on their way 
to school. 

Scent of flowers, strains of music, and the flowers are orange blossoms, 
while the music is the Bridal March. Blooming whiteness strews the path 
of the lovely bride, who comes down slowly. Even in her shyness the smile 
remains the same. By it Gladys is known. Where could be found a more 
suitable one to play the tender role of bride? 

The charming scene fades into the police court, where, before the grim, 
judge, Byron Burton stands on trial for speeding. "Ninety-eighth offense, 
six months imprisonment." The film rolls on. 

Evidently the class was not to lack teachers. In the kindergarten stands 
Helen Johnson, a light of knowledge to the young, and Ruth Ferguson pre- 
sides over a peaceful rural academy. Guy Terhune teaches Pantheism and 
music in an educational institution for foreigners, and Edith Hanna has 
attained an enviable position in Gary. Over the smooth floor of the armory 
glides Mabel McKinley, teaching the neglected art of roller skating. 

Nor does it lack in angels of mercy. In the insignia of the Red Cross 
is Myrtle Truax, ready to relieve the pain of brave warriors, and within the 
white walls of a hospital Dorris Cordell labors. Mary Wershing tenderly 
mirses poodles in an asylum for insane dogs. 

Now a huge ship draws slowly up to land and stops. It is the "Bea- 
gle," landing at South America, and bearing upon its decks the scientist, 
Floyd Ayers, come to search for the fossil bones of buried monsters. With 
him is his faithful secretary, coy Ijouise Ratts, willing for his sake to do 
anything from taking shorthand dictation to studying the position of a 
crab's ears. 

England again. A country crossroads bearing the signs, "To London," 
"To Hawkhurst." And here are parting Elsie Fritch and Thomas Steward, 
exchanging vows and class pins. He goes to London as an amateur gentle- 
man, she to Paris on the trail of adventures. 




^:^ ^:± s> ^ GJS ^^S 




^k^^M^M*M§M 



Then there rolls by films showing industry. Mary MacCammack deftly 
manipulating the Stenotype machine, Edith Fletcher the typewriter, Mir- 
iam Hastings selling shoe strings in a great department store. 

As a contrast to this life of labor is a scene of delightful leisure. Ev- 
erett Shireman has purchased a lot in a quiet little town, and between in- 
tervals of cultivating chickens and sunflowers, dreams and sings in the 
shade of his own plum tree. 

A picture of brightness and gayety. Lucile was ever a charming host- 
ess, and now, as the wife of an Annapolis officer, she captivates the cadets 
by her delightful social functions. 

The stage becomes dim and mysterious. There enters a dark and 
dreamy figure, laden with strange, sinister machines. With amazing inge- 
nuity he constructs implements of destruction. He is called the "Man of 
Terror" — James Reid. Yet he also fears something; he is wan and hag- 
gard, and frequently seems to be in an attitude of listening. Suddenly he 
flees and I see that his old terror of a woman still pursues him. 

But here is one happy one. Dear old Benton Port has at last found a 
companion who appreciates him, and, encouraged by her, acts as county re- 
corder in a pleasant village and plies his trade of artistic photographer. 

What '! Another wedding ! In a bower of lavender and pink sweet 
peas the most beautiful .girl in Center ton becomes the bride of the hand- 
somest man in Paragon, and thus are united beauty and wit. Long maj^ 
they live! Alice Breedlove has helped one pedagogue to find his "Perfect 
Day," and surely he deserves it. Acting as best man we have the loyal rel- 
ative, Wayne Abbott, who already is patiently experiencing the ecstacies 
of matrimony. 

At last I see my shadowy self, searching for something. Perhaps it is 
the elusive Blue Bird of Happiness. I can not tell, for the scene fades 
quickly away and I am left to the tender mercies of the Junior banquet. 

Miriam E. Mason. 




^3 ^:1 Q % o^i^ JSiSt 



Ig^jfl^OSM^^sjSi 



GROWTH IN SCHOOL PROPERTY 

From an Address by Supt. J. E. Robinson, delivered June 4, 1914 



In 1870, the City, then Town of Martinsville became a separate and 
distinct school corporation, having been before this time a part of the 
school corporation of Washington Township. 

The township had in 1867 erected in the North edge of town the front 
of what is now known as the Second Ward school building. When the 
town became an independent school corporation, 1870, it bought the inter- 
est of Washington township in this building for $4,000.00. In 1877 just 
ten years after the front was erected the growth of the schools had been 
so great that an addition was built on the north side of this building at a 
cost of about $6,000.00. 

Six years later, in 1883, because of the crowded condition in the 
schools a block was bought just three squares southeast of the Public 
Sf^uare and on this was erected a small two room school building which 
two years later was replaced by a four room brick building of the latest 
approved type at a cost of $7,500.50. In 1891 an addition to this building 
of the same size and construction was ordered and erected at a cost of 
almost $10,000.00. 

Because of the rapidly increasing enrollment in High School, in 1900, 
the Board of School Trustees found it had become necessary to make 
loom for those who wished to pursue their studies beyond the grades, and 
Mccordingly erected the yjresent High School building just to the north of 
the Thii-d'Ward building at a cost of about $15,000.00.' 

Ill 1S96 more room was required to accommodate the grades and a 
tract in the southwest part of the City on Main Street was purchased of 
J. V. Mitchell and a two room building that would house about one hun- 
dred puj)ils erected the total outlay being about $3,000.00. This afforded 
teiniK)rary relief and in 1903 the Board of Trustees sold this property 
f'oi- $2,495.00 and bought the block just south of the Big Four and west 
of Main Street and erected thereon a modern six room building at a cost 
of about $12,000.00. 

Because of the demand for more room for pupils in both grades and 
High School the Board of School Trustees bought, in 1912, 6.6 acres of 
land six s(]uares south of the Public S(]uare, of Mrs. Hyndman and in 
September of that year let the contract for a new high school building at 
a cost of $43, 500. 00, the building to be comjileted and ready for occupancy 
by September 1, 1914. 



^^ f^^^ ^ 




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tg^il^ESSM^^sjSi 



HISTORY 







, _ -fj_ /^^'' ^'^ ^ ^ ^ ,'^^ 


^Mlili»rfn-«nlirni (rii 



'Twas the best of times; 'twas the worst of times; 
'Twas a, day of conceit; 'twas a day of trembling" 

HEN o 11 September the 
ninth, 1912, we, the class of 
'16, entered okl M. H. S. as 
Freshmen. For did -we not 
have a feeling of importance 
as we joined the host of stu- 
dents! And who could deny 
a slight trembling in his 
heart at the sneer of the 
haughty Seniors, or the dis- 
dain of our neighbors, the 
Sophomores! 

However we aroused ourselves from lethargy, more on account of 
instincts of fear, than from any other cause, and, resolving to show our 
jiredecessors that we were powerful though young, had a meeting at the 
home of Lucile Sartor, and elected officers. Trusting in size we chose 
"Shanks" for our executive. The other officers chosen were Larry Frye, 
vice-president, and Gladys Lewis, secretary-treasurer. Blue and Gold 
were the class colors decided upon. 

The Sophs met us that night, and gave battle. Of course we were 
victorious. 

We enjoyed our first vacation wlien the Twenty-third Infantry, U. S. 
A. passed through our city on September 23, enroute to the border. 

Tuesday afternoon, January 28, Miss Ida Faye Smith read "The 
Merchant of Venice" before High School. This was appreciated by all. 

Miss Hart's English class dramatized a chapter from George Elliott's 
"Silas Marner" and presented it before the other freshmen classes. 
Histrionic talent was evident this early in our High School career. 

Several enjoyable spreads and many Biology hikes livened the 
Spring term, and to cap the climax, we were entertained with a delight- 
ful party at the home of Miss Margaret Rose, north of the city. 

The flood came this vear, the week set for the spring vacation and so 
school was continued much to our satisfaction. 

The next year we found ourselves again assembled in the old build- 
ing, but we were several less in number than in the preceeding year. 

Officers chosen this year were : Larry Frye, President ; Helen Fusel- 
man and Shanks Kriner, Vice-presidents; Gladys Lewis, Secretary-Treas- 
urer. 



wim^^ 



& 1 




hPK^ NUISANCE^ jglSOl^ 



This year we celebrated Mr. Cohee's Marriage, enjoyed ''The Melt- 
ing Pot," read by Miss Ida Faye Smith and the usual programs. The 
Dramatic Club and the H. S. orchestra also made their first appearance 
in the "Ladies of Cranford," in all of Avhich the class of '16 was well 
represented. 

Soon winter was over and Sophomore days with it. Therefore we 
cast aside the wars of Caesar and prepared for the Orations of Marcus 
Tullius with a three months' course in vacation! 

Juniors at last! It was an honour to us that we were among the first 
to occupy the new H. S. building. At the beginning of the term, however, 
we were compelled to recite in the churches and public buildings owing 
to a delay in the construction of our new building. 

This year several new subjects were added to our curriculum : Ger- 
man, Physics, Woodworking, and Commercial Courses being among the 
new studies. 

Our officers for this year were : Shanks, President; Rhea Jenkins, 
V^ice-president ; Gladys Lewis, Secretary-Treasurer. 

The first term was passed in hard labor, with programs and basket- 
ball for recreation. Book-stacking was also "enjoyed. Bible study was 
added this year. 

February nineteentli, formal Dedicatory exercises were held in the 
new building. 

"A Nautical Knot" an operetta was presented by the chorus on Feb- 
I'uai'v 25 in the auditorium. 

As Juniors, it also fell to our lot to try our luck in debating. 

Soon we began making preparations for the Reception, and, after 
much dissension, we decided to have it in the gym, and to make it the 
'Ix'st ever.' 

Several pleasa)it hours were spent in decorating for the Baccalau- 
I'eate and the Commencement. 

Before the close of school, however, we elected the Staff for '15- '16. 

Numbering forty-five, we again assembled and picked seats in the As- 
sembly for the last time. Officers were chosen and pins were selected for 
oui- Senior year. Hobby was elected President; Atch, Vice-president, 
and the same Secietary-treasurer was chosen as in the preceeding years. 

The cliief interest this winter and spring has been centered in the Bas- 
ket-ball team. We have lost six out of nineteen games, won the District 
1\)urnament and came out third in the State Tourney. Three players, 
Krincr, (Joss and Shireman graduate this year. 

Tiie ('lass Play, " lligbee of Harvard" was given Tuesday, May 23, 
the hous(> being well filled, and was considered quite an honour to the 
class. 




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On Thursday, May 25, we received our sheepskins and were after- 
wards delightfully entertained at the home of Superintendent Eobinson. 

And now, on the Twenty-sixth day of May, in the Year of Our Lord 
1916, we bid Goodbye to the jolly old High School days forever! 

So Long! 



My friend, have you heard of the town of Yawn, 

On the banks of the River Slow, 
Where blooms the Waita while Flower fair, 
Where the Sometime orother scents the air. 

And the soft Goeasies grow! 
It lies in the Valley of Whatsthe use, 

In the Province of Leterslicle, 
That tired feeling is native there. 
Its the home of the listless, Idon'tcare, 

Where the-Putitoffs abide. 



CLASS WILL 

LUCILE SARTOR 

We, the Senior-^ of M. H. S., being of sound mind and disposing mem- 
ory, do hereby maj<;e and declare this our last will and testament, hereby 
revoking all former wills and testaments. 

Walter iVcheson My pink cheeks to Doris Young. 

Everett Shireman. .... My slumbers to John Bryce. 

Clara Kirk My demure ways to Edith Beck. 

Pythagarous Ayers. . . .My wisdom to Bertha Rose. 

James Reid My position as Editor-in-Chief to Clay Baker. 

Gladys Lewis My smile to Louise Pearcy. 

Basil Williams My "Olive" to the future H. S. boys. 

Byron Burton My firecrackers to William Kirk. 

Frank Adams My job as official tardy bell ringer to Cecil Harper. 

Alice Breedlove My height to Mildred Miller. 

Benton Port My green suit to Howard Northern. 

Rae Jenkins My crimson locks to Hobart Crone. 

Mabel McKinley My studious disposition to Cecil Frye. 

Miriam Mason My freckles to Marvon Jenkins. 

Juliet Baldwin My "Bobbed hair" to Emily Lynch. 

Dewey Goss My luck to any one that luants it. 

Dorothy Tevis My ability to write notes to Doan Nutter. 



hPh^ ISU]SANCE»Jjgt80lf 



Winifred Crawford. . . My good nature to Flossie Wheeler. 

Larry Frye My plaid shirt to Sid Smith. 

Gertrude Myers My mild disposition to Erma Cox. 

Shirley Kriner I think (f) I shall keep this case. 

Louise Ratts My designs on the Editor-in-Chief to Ruth Walters. 

Helen Bain My borrowed clothes to their owners. 

Charles Patton My commanding ways to Naomi Gnm. 

Wayne Abbott The elevation of my head to my brother. 

Iniogene Clark My curls to Martha Asher. 

Ruth Pearcy My stand in with Clarence to Lucy Patton. 

Dad Louder My position as yell leader to Tronie. 

Lucile Sartor My tem,per to Clara Watson. 

Margaret Rose My brother to the B. B. Team of 1917. 

Elsie Fritcli My white shoes to Nona Henderson. 

Bess Steele My place in the club to Alberta Smith. 

Guy Terliune My walk to Mose. 

Ray Haase My speed to Helen Clark. 

Edith Hannah My black hair to Edith Cramer. 

Dorris Cordell My coquettish ivays to Mary Fletcher. 

Ruth Furguson My curly hair to Louis Thome. 

Helen Johnson Wly ability as match maker to Mr. Silshy. 

Myrtle Truax My singing voice to Katherine Mouse r. 

Mary Wershing My size to Glen Cunningham. 

Thomas Steward My power as girl fascinator to Howard Ay res. 

Edith Fletcher My ambition to Jessie Haase. 

Helen Fuselman My Bloomington lovers to Harriet Sweet. 

Mar}^ McCamack My seat in assembly to Forest Thome. 

Miriam Hastings My Junior sweetheart, Loyd Walls to Mary Gum. 

Pauline Comer My Soph to Mable Pr ingle. 



What is writ is writ- 
Would it were worthier! 

Farewell! a word that must be, and hath been— 
A sound which makes us linger; yet, farewell!" 



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STEELE & WEST 



Band-Sawed Lumber 



WE WILL BUY YOUR LOGS 



WE WILL SELL YOU LUMBER 



"WE'RE BEHIND THE GOODS' 

CURE & SON 

FURNITURE, STOVES, RITQS 
PIANOS 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



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BUY THE BEST 



REYNOLD'S 

ASPHALT SHINGLES 



FOR SALE BY 



Deming Lumber Co. 



MARTINSVILLE IND. 

W. MORGAN ST. 



BLACKSTONE 
THEATRE 



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ADAMS CLAY 
PRODUCTS CO. 


B 


"The Toggerg Shop"- 


MANUFACTURERS OF 

EGYPTIAN, PLAIN RED, COLONIAL, 
VARIEGATED AND RED MATS 
VERTICAL CUTS AND COMMON 
BRICK. 


S 

a 


THE HOME OF 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX 
CLOTHES 
FURNISHINGS AND HATS THAT 
ARE RIGHT. 


CAPACITY 50 OOa PER DAY 


"1 


FRANK STEGN-ER 



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CARLETON'S 
Citi; Drug Store 

WEST SIDE SQUARE 

MARTINSVILLE, IND. 



DIXIE HIGHWAY 



GARAGE 



MOTORCYCLE - BICYCLE 
SUPPLIES AND REPAIRING 
PRICES RIGHT 
WORK GUARANTEED 

42 SOUTH MAIN STREET 



COOK 




YOUR FRIENDS CAN BUY ANY- 




S 


THING YOU CAN GIVE THEM 


With Gas 


= 


EXCEPT YOUR PHOTOGRAPii: 


LIGHT 


S 

Ml 


Kelso Studio 


With Electricity 


a 


DICKSON B.LDG. PHONE D B !'■ 



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CANDY DRY GOODS 

WELCOME 
TO 

NEW STORE 

MOORE'S 5 & 10c 
STORE 

NOTHING OVER 25c 
WELCOME 



ALWAYS 



Ribbons 



Notions 



TRADE AT 



BARSKINS 

The Same Goods 
For Less Money 

More Goods For 
The Same Money 



UIIIIIIIIIUHIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllJlllllllHlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllMIIIIIIHIIUIIIIIIIIIII 



THORNBURGH 
MILLING CO. 

FLOURS 

PATENT. CROWN PRINCE, BtlST, 
PEERLESS 

FEED OP ALL KINDS 
CHICKEN FEED A SPECIALTY 
B. E. THORNBURGH PROPRIETOPv 



C. F. Schnaiter 



PURIFY YOUR PREMISES BY 
WHITE WASHING WITH LUMP 
LIME. IT DISINFECTS AND PRE- 
VENTS DISEASE 

Lime, Cement & Sewer Pipe 

PHONE D B 10 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllJIIIIIIHIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



When your shoes are sick 
bring them to me. 

I Am the Gui;. 


1 THE 

1 Johnston GroceryCo 


Wear-U-Well 


1 "Pure Food Distributors." 


SHOE STORE 

43 S. MAIN ST. 


= 66 S. Main St. Lewis BIdg. 



A SCHOOL OF SPECIALIZATION 



You are now ready to specialize; you feel that you must con- 
centrate all your efforts in preparing for some specific line of 
work; you have the foundation; what you want to do now 
is to enter a school of specialization. 
It is the purpose of this school to train you for business. 

When you become competent, our Emploi^ment Department 
will aid you in securing a position. Write for full particulars, 
Now. or better still, call and see our school. Address Fred 
W. Case, Prin. 

CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE 

Cor. Ohio and Alabama Sts. 
I N DIAN APO LIS, I N D. 

:illllllHlilHllliilllllllllllllllliliii!lilliilili!3llllliHlliiliiiiiiliiilliii!ii!li!!i!i!!!i!!!!!!!;'JIIIII!HiMii!i!iHlTi 

Have You Tried The Flour 

Manufactured by the 

MARTINSVILLE MILLING CO? 

If not, buy a bag of the Special Patent Magnolia 
or Puritp. 

None better manufactured from Winter Wheat for 
the price. 

3lilllllllltlilliiillilllllllllillilii!iii!iillll!l!iillllllHlllllillllllllllllllli!!ii!!i!!!i»il!iii!!Li!i!!ili!!ii!i»iltiil!M 

CALL 'EM UP 

F A 41 IS THE NUMBER 



The Benzol Cleaners 

I S THE PLACE 

Best Equipment. Sanitary Steam or Dry Cleaning. Clean Work. 
Sanitary Steam Pressing. 

THE BENZOL CLEANERS 

10 years experience. Located next door to Martinsville Harness Co. 



WASHINGTON STREET GARAGE 



CRAMER BROS. 

Automobile Repairing. Carbon Removed. 

TIRES AND ACCESSORIES 



STORAGE 



lllllllHllilllillllilllllllllllllllllllllll»llltlt»»llll!!!iH!!lH"IHIII0llllHllilHlHIEBB5a»liy'JIHIIIHIHillilil»tiif 




HUGH 

DILLON 

PROP 



dllllllllllUlllllilllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllBllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliLlllllllllllilltllllUlll 



Phone D H 4. 



H. H. Lowe, Prop. 



ACME CLEANERS AND DYERS. 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Pressing, Repairing and Altering 

Courtesy, Satisfaction and a Square Deal. 

12 Years Experience. Suits Tailored to your Individual Measure. 

Give us a call. 172 E. Washington St. City. 

lllllllllllHlllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIEJIIIiiiillilliillilillllllilllllllllliiiiillliHIiitJIIIillillitHlillllllH 

SPORT OXFORDS 

for 
YOUNG LADIES 

H U F F ' S 

IIIIIIIHIIMlllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllJIIIIIIilllillllllllllllllllllllllllinilHIlllllllilHIIililEULdaiilllllll 

When You Want 

Printing 

Think of 
The Martinsville Democrat 

G E. Finneg's Sons. 



WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS 

E. E. CLARK 

THE GARMENT CLEANER 

SUPERIOR CLEANING AND RE- 
PAIRING. SATISFACTION GUAR- 
ANTEED. 

WORK CALLED FOR AND 
DELIVERED. 
PHONE D A 15 127 E. WASH. ST. 



TENNIS SHOES AND OXFORDS 
IN BLACK AND WHITE FOR 
BOYS AND GIRLS 

THE 

PREWITT 

SHOE 

CO. 

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TRY OUR HOME-MADE ICE CREAM 
AND ICES; ALSO FRESH HOME 
MADE CANDY 


S 
s 


FOR WRITING MATERIALS OF 
ALL KINDS, PENS, PENCILS, 
TABLETS, INKS, ETC 

FOR ALL SORTS OF 

5, 10, 25c GOODS 






Go to 


GREEK 




KINNEAR'S 






VARIETY STORE 


Candy Store 


a 
1. 


East Side Square 
Martinsville, Ind. 



!!IIIIIIHIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllll:illllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII[(!IIIIIIHIIIlllllllllll| 



UP-TO-DATE 


1 


ABRAHAM'S 


DRUG STORE 

EDGAR TARLETON, PROP. 


s 

s 
s 


Ice Cream Parlor 

JOHNSTON CHOCOLATES 
BALLARD'S CREAM 


78 N. MAIN ST. TEL. D H 10 
MARTINSVILLE, IND. 




Try Us and be 
Convinced. 



:!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllJIIIIIIHIHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIimilllllllllll[IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIII 



IF YOU TRADE ELSEWHERE 
WE BOTH LOSE 

DALE 

& 
SON 

JEWELERS & OPTICIANS 



■B 



Kodaks 
Candies 

ROY E. TILFORD 



ATHLETIC GOODS 

FOUNTAIN PENS 



A. R. SHIREMAN & SON 



Drayage and Storage. Coal, Wood, Lime, Plaster, Cement, Fire-brick 
and Clay; Artesian Mineral "Water; Barrel Salt, Hides and Wool. 



All kinds of Teaming. 



Martinsville, Ind. 



: illllllHllilillllllllllllllllllllillllilllllllillif!llllliHlillHIIIIHIIIIIIIIiliiiiil!!!!!iHJ»il!I!illillHliilililliillll 

B. E. LEWIS, Red Star Shoes. 

i!llllil!llllllllHlllllllllillllllllllillll-(lllllliDJllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lll!!!l!iiliiil!!LI!lllllll!lll!IIIIlUIII 



O R £ 



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Buick, Grant, Reo, Max- 
well AUTOMOBILES 



MARTINSVILLE AUTO CO. 



LET THIS BE A REMINDER 
That You Can Bui; The 


a 


UP-TO-DATE 


VERY BEST 

IN HARDWARE 

At Reasonable Prices at 


1 


MILLINERY 


WHITE 
HARDWARE CO. 

GIVE US A TRIAL 


s 
s 


AT 

Sallie Shearer's 



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Preston 's 

For 

Service 

45 W. Morgan St. 

Harr^ Preston, Prop. 



STEAM HEAT RUNNING WATER 

HARVEYS 

European Hotel 

FIRST CLASS CAPE IN CONNEC- 
TION 

Meals 25c 

' SANDWICHES OF ALL KINDS 

Rooms 50c, 75c, $1.00 

MARTINSVILLE, IND. 



!!llllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllUllilllli:!IIIllllllEIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiIIIISIIiiillie[i!llllllHIHIIIIIIiUlll 



REID BROS. 

CONTRACTORS 



CEMENT WORK 



OF ALL KINDS 



HUBBARD 

LUMBER CO. 

MARTINSVILLE 

PORCH BOXES, SCREEN DOORS, 
AND WINDOWS; ALL KINDS OF 

MILL WORK, HOUSE AND 
FLOOR PAINTS 



UllllillillllHIIIIIIIllllllllllllilliBllllilllllilJIIIIillllllliilllllllllllllllilllllllMllllllllllieilllllllllBaEIUIllitlli 



OUR PRICES ARE LOW 
OUR QUALITY HIGH 


1 


YOU CAN 


OUR SERVICE THE BEST 


a 


AFFORD 


SO GIVE US A TRY 


5 






S 


To Eat The Best 


SWAIN'S 


mm 


IF YOU BUY AT THE 




S 
s 


HADLEY 


GROCERY 


s 


Grocery Co. 




s 


PHONE, D F 20 


PHONES: D F 40; F A 13 


w 





— FOR— 

OR A 
DRINK OF 



Pure Ice Cream orPnkof Delicious Soda 



CALL AT 

SHIREMAN'S 

Jlllllillliililillllllilllillllllllg8Hii!iiilllllilllllllllHilllSiiiilillllllliiliiiii§ii5i8gisiiii»i!Lii!!iii{iliiiMiJaHitlE 

THE 

MARTINSVILLE TRUST CO. 

Is The Home of Christmas Savings 
It is not too late to join the 1916 club 

Watch for our new scheme for Savings. We will introduce it soon 
after we move into our new home. Nothing like it. 

C. 0. ABBOTT; Sec'y. 

lllllllllllllliniiilll»lllillliliiiHiliHaiiilli[Jiili!lliiliKgi!IH!iillilii!liliiiiii!iiiM8iti>i|[lli8!aSiillli!iil!iiiiii 

ALSPACH'S 'THAT NIFTY SHOE STORE. 

is headquarters for the young lady or gentleman students who know 
REAL COLLEGE STYLE. Our windows are crowded with new styles in 
Golf— Outing—Sport— Camping and Tennis Shoes. Notice these in pass- 
ing or drop in and look. 

ALSPACH'S CASH SHOE CO. 

of course. 

!lllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllliilliilllllllJiiillllil!llillllliliii5iiHiiiiiiiiiii»iiiiiiiii[|||||||iii»i8i»ttiu»./ 

MARTINSVILLE BRICK CO. 



Manufacturers of high grade 
building and paving brick. 



'■nil 




i GILES M.DICKSON 

^M - The Store for. Men • ^^M 

||||aTAiLORiNG - Hats -Furnishings 

s^^sr^ ^* Let me take Your measure 



ailllllHIUIUIIIIIIilllllllllllillllBHllHllllllOilllllllUIUJHIIIIHIllllllllllllllHllllSHIillEinillllllilllllllUiltlll 



CITIZEN'S AUTO COMPANY. 

Complete Lineof Automobile Accessories & Repairs 

Mobiloils Hassler's Shock Absorbers 

Miller Tires Kelly-Springfield Tires 



!lllllllHllliHIII8IIIIHIIIiHllllllllllllillllllliJllllliHltMHIIilllllllllllHlililliiltgBiBiiilli«JllllilHimHIIIHIIII 

EFFICIENCY 

IS OUR MOTTO 

We Specialize in Young Men's Wearing Apparel 
Call and Look Around 

JENKINS & MANNAN 

IllllllHIHIHllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHllllHIIIIIilllllllllllllllllllllllllllillLiUlllllllllllHllllHii/ 



COFFEE 



TEA 



JEWEL TEA CO. incorporated 

IMPORTERS, MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS i ] 

Jewel Products Retail Only. 

From Producer to Consumer — Buy the Jewel Way. 

SPICES, COCOA, SPAGHETTI, SOAP, CLEANSER, STARCH, BLUING, 
POWERED AMMONIA, TOILET SOAP, CASTILE SOAP, TOILET 
ARTICLES, PIANO POLISH PHONE. D E 10 

R. H. MARSHALL, Agent. 909 E. Washington St., Martinsville. 



Baking Powder 



Extracts 



MERRIMAN 

& WASSON 

CO. 



5 & 10c Store 

WEST OF COURT HOUSE 



MERRIMAN 

& WASSON 

CO. 



CANDIES, PEANUTS, CHOCOLATES ' FRESH EVERY WEEK 

THE BETTER KIND 
STATIONERY - BOOKS SOUVENIRS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, 

PENNANTS 
YOUR DOLLAR HAS MORE CENTS WHEN SPENT HERE 

lllllllHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiliillilll»lliilllHliiiBliiiitlilllllllllllili!iii!i!llliii!l»lllllliHilllliliiitllll 

THE 

Davis Cooperage Co. 

MARTINSVILLE, INDIANA. 

JIIIIIIHIIIIIHilllliillllliilillillil!iiiiiillliiO.IIIIIIIHimiilillilllllllllliiili!ilii!i!ililil!iriiiiiillii!i!liillllllTi 

To The Young Man Graduate. 

"If you keep your head when all about you 

Are losing theirs and blaming it O'l you; 
If you can fill the unforgiving minute 

With sixty seconds, worth of distance run: 
Yours is the earth and eve:-ything that's in it; 

And — which is more — you'll be a man - my son." 

Sincerely yours, 

ENNIS BROS. 

lilllllllllHilllllilllillllllllllllllllll llllllllllJIIIIIIIIIHmilllllllllllllllillllllliiilllllllill'JllllllHIHHiiilUMlf 

Martinsville Floral Co. 

NIXON H. GANO, Proprietor. 

865 East Harrison Street. 
Phones D D 12 & F B 24. 

' Martinsville, Indiana 




The Proprietor! 



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